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Teenage Counseling Frisco TX

Being the parent of a teen or preteen isn't always easy, and there are many difficult subjects you have to tackle. Learn more about why certain teens engage in risky behavior and what to do if you think your child is doing so, right here in this article.

Mrs. Kate Spradlin
Kate Spradlin
(972) 243-1159
18170 Dallas Parkway Ste 502
Dallas, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW,LMFT
Licensed in Texas
35 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Psychoses/Majo
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Grandparents, Obese or Overweight, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Judy Redington
Judy G. Redington
(972) 233-5277
12800 Hillcrest Rd #218
Dallas, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, ACSW
Licensed in Texas
35 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Mark Hokamp
(940) 387-3093
927 North Locust St.
Denton, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
20 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Men's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Sven K Daelemans
(214) 838-7214
9741 Preston Road
Frisco, TX
Specialties
Divorce, Relationship Issues, Child or Adolescent, Impulse Control Disorders
Qualification
School: Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX
Year of Graduation: 1989
Years In Practice: 5 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Male
Age: Adolescents,Adults
Average Cost
$80 - $90
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Carol Regehr
(214) 919-9687
Healing For The Heart3550 Parkwood Blvd.
Frisco, TX
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Divorce, Anxiety or Fears
Qualification
School: Dallas Theological Seminary
Year of Graduation: 1998
Years In Practice: 10+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adolescents,Adults
Average Cost
$110 - $120
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No

Mrs. Michelle Aldridge Morris
(940) 391-1201
2436 S. I-35 Suite 376, #143
Denton, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Runaways, Sexual Abuse/R
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Monique Thompson
Monique Thompson, LPC
(972) 820-9965
6021 Morriss Road Suite 100
Flower Mound, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LPC
Licensed in Texas
5 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Couple or Marital Issues, Family Dysfunction, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Spiritual/Religious Concerns, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
DFW Frisco
214-387-4773 214-387-4773 <
2787 Preston Rd Ste 1150
Frisco, TX
 
Ms. Kimberly Gist Miller
(214) 872-4334
Harmony Counseling Services5850 Town and Country Blvd.
Frisco, TX
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Parenting, Divorce
Qualification
School: CSU Long Beach
Year of Graduation: 1996
Years In Practice: 10+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adults
Average Cost
$110 - $120
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Ms. Sheila Ruble
(469) 844-9190
Frisco Counseling and Wellness6842 Lebanon, Suite 103
Frisco, TX
Specialties
Addiction, Divorce, Family Conflict
Qualification
School: University of Nebraska-Kearney
Years In Practice: 6 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$80 - $160
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Data Provided by:

Teenage Counseling

The Mysterious Teenage Brain

~The Mysterious Teenage Brain^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 28 March 2008

Recent research highlighted in the Wall Street Journal sheds light on some reasons for the roller-coaster ride of adolescence--and it's all about the brain.

ImageOn one hand, neuroscientists point out that the teenage brain is uniquely tuned to chemical highs and lows, making it especially vulnerable to stress, addictions and experimenting with dangerous behaviors. Similarly, a brain-image study at UCLA revealed a region of the teenage brain that overreacts to rewards and unexpected stimuli. This may explain why teens seek experiences they find rewarding even though they might be potentially harmful.

However, adolescents also perceive risk and uncertainty differently than adults do, according to neuroscience researchers at New York University. Surprisingly, teenagers try to avoid risks more than adults, although teens are more likely to make a choice before fully investigating possible consequences.

Stress ... danger ... overreactions ... risk ... uncertainty. It’s all part of the great mystery of a teenager. Many fathers who have teenagers can actually view these research findings as good news. It's somewhat comforting to know there’s a good explanation for the way our teens are acting, and that we aren’t alone in our struggles to understand our children and get along. With teens, this is pretty close to normal. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Fathering Teens: A Balancing Act^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

Research on adolescent development by Child Trends notes that teens and their behaviors frequently “cluster”: good or bad behaviors (and good or bad peers) tend to come in groups. For instance, if your teen is struggling academically, he is likely to add a group of other negative behaviors, such as smoking, taking drugs, binge drinking or risky sexual behavior; and he will likely associate with friends who struggle with those same issues. As the number of negative behaviors increases, teens will isolate themselves in groups that have similar behaviors. Clearly, this phenomenon presents enormous challenges for fathers who hope to intervene and help their adolescents.

ImageThe survey also lists some positive ways fathers can contribute to their teens’ lives and help them navigate the adolescent years without serious trauma. They can model and promote physical health through exercise and good eating habits, encourage their teens in school, attend their extracurricular activities, and help them understand the consequences of risky behaviors.

Kristin Moore, president of Child Trends , sums up the findings aptly: “These findings suggest that parents need to remain actively and positively involved in the lives of their teenagers, while also allowing adolescents to take on greater independence for their conduct, as appropriate for their ages.”

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Help, I Think My Teen is Using Drugs^

Written by Walt Mueller

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

Page 1 of 2

All Ray wanted to do was use the phone. He picked up the receiver and got ready to dial but his 16-year-old son Jeff was on the phone with a friend. Before Ray could put the receiver down, something about Jeff’s hushed tone made him listen. "I’ve got $20. That should be enough to set us up for the weekend", he heard Jeff say. Curious, Ray listened a little longer as Jeff and his friend peppered their conversation with strange words like "blunts", "pocket rockets", and "hot sticks."

Ray didn’t have a clue what was going on until he heard Jeff’s friend mention he had invited some other kids to meet them to "smoke some weed." Stunned, Ray quietly hung up the phone. After 16 years of loving and raising his son, he wondered if the unimaginable could really be happening. He felt like somebody had punched him in the stomach.

ImageEach and every day, hundreds of parents like Ray are shocked to discover that their child is using and abusing drugs or alcohol. For Diane, it took a phone call from the school guidance counselor. "Could you come into my office right away?" the guidance counselor asked. "We need to talk about your daughter Rachel. We found a bottle of wine in her locker and we have reason to believe that she’s been drinking in school". ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teens and the "Terrible Toos"^

Written by Randell D. Turner, Ph.D.

Date Posted: Thursday, 26 June 2008

We're all familiar with that phase in many toddlers' lives called the "Terrible Twos." It’s when their lifelong struggle for independence begins. The word "No" becomes their personal creed and the most frequent word used by parent and child alike! This once so loving, laughing and playful child seemingly overnight becomes very selfish and self-centered. Although we call it the "terrible twos," it can last into year three and four for some children.

During these years parent learn the true meaning of words like patience, perseverance and prayer! The one bright hope for parents during this time is knowing that this is only a phase and it will end ... at least that what you thought.

Actually your child will go through a similar phase again a few years later—but this time it’s the “Terrible Toos”! Let me illustrate:

Your 12-year-old daughter gets ready for school then comes down to breakfast. Upon seeing her fashion choice for the day, your first response might sound something like this; “That skirt is TOO tight to be wearing to school!” Or, “You take TOO long in the bathroom. Other people have to get ready in the morning TOO!”

ImageAs the pre-teen and teen years roll on, these statements become more frequent. Some of the most common may sound familiar at your house.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Fathering Teens: A Balancing Act

~The Mysterious Teenage Brain^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 28 March 2008

Recent research highlighted in the Wall Street Journal sheds light on some reasons for the roller-coaster ride of adolescence--and it's all about the brain.

ImageOn one hand, neuroscientists point out that the teenage brain is uniquely tuned to chemical highs and lows, making it especially vulnerable to stress, addictions and experimenting with dangerous behaviors. Similarly, a brain-image study at UCLA revealed a region of the teenage brain that overreacts to rewards and unexpected stimuli. This may explain why teens seek experiences they find rewarding even though they might be potentially harmful.

However, adolescents also perceive risk and uncertainty differently than adults do, according to neuroscience researchers at New York University. Surprisingly, teenagers try to avoid risks more than adults, although teens are more likely to make a choice before fully investigating possible consequences.

Stress ... danger ... overreactions ... risk ... uncertainty. It’s all part of the great mystery of a teenager. Many fathers who have teenagers can actually view these research findings as good news. It's somewhat comforting to know there’s a good explanation for the way our teens are acting, and that we aren’t alone in our struggles to understand our children and get along. With teens, this is pretty close to normal. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Fathering Teens: A Balancing Act^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

Research on adolescent development by Child Trends notes that teens and their behaviors frequently “cluster”: good or bad behaviors (and good or bad peers) tend to come in groups. For instance, if your teen is struggling academically, he is likely to add a group of other negative behaviors, such as smoking, taking drugs, binge drinking or risky sexual behavior; and he will likely associate with friends who struggle with those same issues. As the number of negative behaviors increases, teens will isolate themselves in groups that have similar behaviors. Clearly, this phenomenon presents enormous challenges for fathers who hope to intervene and help their adolescents.

ImageThe survey also lists some positive ways fathers can contribute to their teens’ lives and help them navigate the adolescent years without serious trauma. They can model and promote physical health through exercise and good eating habits, encourage their teens in school, attend their extracurricular activities, and help them understand the consequences of risky behaviors.

Kristin Moore, president of Child Trends , sums up the findings aptly: “These findings suggest that parents need to remain actively and positively involved in the lives of their teenagers, while also allowing adolescents to take on greater independence for their conduct, as appropriate for their ages.”

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Help, I Think My Teen is Using Drugs^

Written by Walt Mueller

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

Page 1 of 2

All Ray wanted to do was use the phone. He picked up the receiver and got ready to dial but his 16-year-old son Jeff was on the phone with a friend. Before Ray could put the receiver down, something about Jeff’s hushed tone made him listen. "I’ve got $20. That should be enough to set us up for the weekend", he heard Jeff say. Curious, Ray listened a little longer as Jeff and his friend peppered their conversation with strange words like "blunts", "pocket rockets", and "hot sticks."

Ray didn’t have a clue what was going on until he heard Jeff’s friend mention he had invited some other kids to meet them to "smoke some weed." Stunned, Ray quietly hung up the phone. After 16 years of loving and raising his son, he wondered if the unimaginable could really be happening. He felt like somebody had punched him in the stomach.

ImageEach and every day, hundreds of parents like Ray are shocked to discover that their child is using and abusing drugs or alcohol. For Diane, it took a phone call from the school guidance counselor. "Could you come into my office right away?" the guidance counselor asked. "We need to talk about your daughter Rachel. We found a bottle of wine in her locker and we have reason to believe that she’s been drinking in school". ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teens and the "Terrible Toos"^

Written by Randell D. Turner, Ph.D.

Date Posted: Thursday, 26 June 2008

We're all familiar with that phase in many toddlers' lives called the "Terrible Twos." It’s when their lifelong struggle for independence begins. The word "No" becomes their personal creed and the most frequent word used by parent and child alike! This once so loving, laughing and playful child seemingly overnight becomes very selfish and self-centered. Although we call it the "terrible twos," it can last into year three and four for some children.

During these years parent learn the true meaning of words like patience, perseverance and prayer! The one bright hope for parents during this time is knowing that this is only a phase and it will end ... at least that what you thought.

Actually your child will go through a similar phase again a few years later—but this time it’s the “Terrible Toos”! Let me illustrate:

Your 12-year-old daughter gets ready for school then comes down to breakfast. Upon seeing her fashion choice for the day, your first response might sound something like this; “That skirt is TOO tight to be wearing to school!” Or, “You take TOO long in the bathroom. Other people have to get ready in the morning TOO!”

ImageAs the pre-teen and teen years roll on, these statements become more frequent. Some of the most common may sound familiar at your house.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Help, I Think My Teen is Using Drugs

~The Mysterious Teenage Brain^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 28 March 2008

Recent research highlighted in the Wall Street Journal sheds light on some reasons for the roller-coaster ride of adolescence--and it's all about the brain.

ImageOn one hand, neuroscientists point out that the teenage brain is uniquely tuned to chemical highs and lows, making it especially vulnerable to stress, addictions and experimenting with dangerous behaviors. Similarly, a brain-image study at UCLA revealed a region of the teenage brain that overreacts to rewards and unexpected stimuli. This may explain why teens seek experiences they find rewarding even though they might be potentially harmful.

However, adolescents also perceive risk and uncertainty differently than adults do, according to neuroscience researchers at New York University. Surprisingly, teenagers try to avoid risks more than adults, although teens are more likely to make a choice before fully investigating possible consequences.

Stress ... danger ... overreactions ... risk ... uncertainty. It’s all part of the great mystery of a teenager. Many fathers who have teenagers can actually view these research findings as good news. It's somewhat comforting to know there’s a good explanation for the way our teens are acting, and that we aren’t alone in our struggles to understand our children and get along. With teens, this is pretty close to normal. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Fathering Teens: A Balancing Act^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

Research on adolescent development by Child Trends notes that teens and their behaviors frequently “cluster”: good or bad behaviors (and good or bad peers) tend to come in groups. For instance, if your teen is struggling academically, he is likely to add a group of other negative behaviors, such as smoking, taking drugs, binge drinking or risky sexual behavior; and he will likely associate with friends who struggle with those same issues. As the number of negative behaviors increases, teens will isolate themselves in groups that have similar behaviors. Clearly, this phenomenon presents enormous challenges for fathers who hope to intervene and help their adolescents.

ImageThe survey also lists some positive ways fathers can contribute to their teens’ lives and help them navigate the adolescent years without serious trauma. They can model and promote physical health through exercise and good eating habits, encourage their teens in school, attend their extracurricular activities, and help them understand the consequences of risky behaviors.

Kristin Moore, president of Child Trends , sums up the findings aptly: “These findings suggest that parents need to remain actively and positively involved in the lives of their teenagers, while also allowing adolescents to take on greater independence for their conduct, as appropriate for their ages.”

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Help, I Think My Teen is Using Drugs^

Written by Walt Mueller

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

Page 1 of 2

All Ray wanted to do was use the phone. He picked up the receiver and got ready to dial but his 16-year-old son Jeff was on the phone with a friend. Before Ray could put the receiver down, something about Jeff’s hushed tone made him listen. "I’ve got $20. That should be enough to set us up for the weekend", he heard Jeff say. Curious, Ray listened a little longer as Jeff and his friend peppered their conversation with strange words like "blunts", "pocket rockets", and "hot sticks."

Ray didn’t have a clue what was going on until he heard Jeff’s friend mention he had invited some other kids to meet them to "smoke some weed." Stunned, Ray quietly hung up the phone. After 16 years of loving and raising his son, he wondered if the unimaginable could really be happening. He felt like somebody had punched him in the stomach.

ImageEach and every day, hundreds of parents like Ray are shocked to discover that their child is using and abusing drugs or alcohol. For Diane, it took a phone call from the school guidance counselor. "Could you come into my office right away?" the guidance counselor asked. "We need to talk about your daughter Rachel. We found a bottle of wine in her locker and we have reason to believe that she’s been drinking in school". ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teens and the "Terrible Toos"^

Written by Randell D. Turner, Ph.D.

Date Posted: Thursday, 26 June 2008

We're all familiar with that phase in many toddlers' lives called the "Terrible Twos." It’s when their lifelong struggle for independence begins. The word "No" becomes their personal creed and the most frequent word used by parent and child alike! This once so loving, laughing and playful child seemingly overnight becomes very selfish and self-centered. Although we call it the "terrible twos," it can last into year three and four for some children.

During these years parent learn the true meaning of words like patience, perseverance and prayer! The one bright hope for parents during this time is knowing that this is only a phase and it will end ... at least that what you thought.

Actually your child will go through a similar phase again a few years later—but this time it’s the “Terrible Toos”! Let me illustrate:

Your 12-year-old daughter gets ready for school then comes down to breakfast. Upon seeing her fashion choice for the day, your first response might sound something like this; “That skirt is TOO tight to be wearing to school!” Or, “You take TOO long in the bathroom. Other people have to get ready in the morning TOO!”

ImageAs the pre-teen and teen years roll on, these statements become more frequent. Some of the most common may sound familiar at your house.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com