Stay-at-Home Dads El Paso TX

Being an at-home dad isn't for everyone, but if you're considering this option, let's look at a few things you'll want to think about. First, and most obvious, look at the financial considerations. Second, find a support network to help you survive and thrive. And third, be ready for how people will react.

Ms. Aurora Alvarez
CYFD - PSD - I-HS
(575) 882-7900
945 Anthony Dr.
Anthony, NM
Credentials
Credentials: LMSW
Licensed in New Mexico
2 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Child Abuse and Neglect, Family Dysfunction, Parenting Issues
Populations Served
Offenders/Perpetrators
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Irma Gonzalez
(915) 526-2300
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, School, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish, English

Karen Lee Sanders
(915) 532-2030
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish

Janise G Pries
(915) 434-0746
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish

Linda Wagner
(915) 585-9760
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Monica McGowan
(915) 781-9900
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Elizabeth Salazar Young
(915) 592-3287
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish

Jose E Martinez
El Paso, TX
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sports Counseling, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish

Myriam Kadri
(915) 838-8222
el paso, TX
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish, French

Model Cities - El Paso
(915) 591-0404
11199 Pellicano Dr
El Paso, TX
 
Data Provided by:

Stay-at-Home Dads

Considerations for At-Home Dads

~Considerations for At-Home Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

The old Michael Keaton Mr. Mom movie got laughs by playing off the public perception that men were out of place as full-time caretakers for their children. But more and more couples are discovering that, for them, having Dad stay home is the right decision.

ImageAttitudes in our society have certainly changed in recent years. For one thing, fathers are generally more involved in their kids' lives than a generation or even a decade ago. Their co-workers and bosses are also more open to family-friendly policies.

Being an at-home dad isn't for everyone, but if you're considering this option, let's look at a few things you'll want to think about.

First, and most obvious, look at the financial considerations. Even if you aren't going to be the main breadwinner, you still have a responsibility to see that your children are provided for.

Second, find a support network to help you survive and thrive. At-home parent groups overwhelmingly cater to moms, but at-home dads are a rapidly growing group, and they face some unique challenges.

There are some great online resources and networks for at-home dads, but also be cognizant of activity in your neighborhood, at the playground, and throughout the community. When you're taking care of your child, you're bound to spy another dad doing the same. Go out of your way and make a friendly connection. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~DAD, The Man at Home^

Written by Patrick Mitchell

Date Posted: Thursday, 26 April 2007

"I'm at the park. I'll call you if I need you-over," says my nine-year-old son into one of three state-of-the-art walkie-talkies that I recently bought for our family of five. "Roger. Be back home in 15 minutes for dinner-over," is my reply.

ImageThe walkie-talkies were expensive by toy standards, but cheap when an at-home dad factors in peace of mind. I must admit, there's something official and cool about saying "Over ... roger ... copy" into one of 400 channels, which I have pre-selected for my kids. They're fun to play with; and yet, these high-tech toys are an important tool in my fatherhood toolkit.

It was not easy giving my kids longer (electronic) leashes so they could range farther from home. But nine-year-olds need more freedom than eight-year-olds, and the walkie-talkies allowed me to give them some freedom and still keep tabs on them.

I cannot think of any moms offhand who would buy long-range communication devices for their nine-year-old children to use electronic-kid-on-a-leash style. But let's be honest: some of the things we dads do are rather outlandish. At-home dads do things differently, and not just to sustain the stereotype that we're innovators, but because we can't escape this immutable truth: We're men, we're the adults, we're dads, and we're supposed to be in charge. My new high-tech devices speak to that truth-it's okay to play, but let's remember who's the boss.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

DAD, The Man at Home

~Considerations for At-Home Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

The old Michael Keaton Mr. Mom movie got laughs by playing off the public perception that men were out of place as full-time caretakers for their children. But more and more couples are discovering that, for them, having Dad stay home is the right decision.

ImageAttitudes in our society have certainly changed in recent years. For one thing, fathers are generally more involved in their kids' lives than a generation or even a decade ago. Their co-workers and bosses are also more open to family-friendly policies.

Being an at-home dad isn't for everyone, but if you're considering this option, let's look at a few things you'll want to think about.

First, and most obvious, look at the financial considerations. Even if you aren't going to be the main breadwinner, you still have a responsibility to see that your children are provided for.

Second, find a support network to help you survive and thrive. At-home parent groups overwhelmingly cater to moms, but at-home dads are a rapidly growing group, and they face some unique challenges.

There are some great online resources and networks for at-home dads, but also be cognizant of activity in your neighborhood, at the playground, and throughout the community. When you're taking care of your child, you're bound to spy another dad doing the same. Go out of your way and make a friendly connection. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~DAD, The Man at Home^

Written by Patrick Mitchell

Date Posted: Thursday, 26 April 2007

"I'm at the park. I'll call you if I need you-over," says my nine-year-old son into one of three state-of-the-art walkie-talkies that I recently bought for our family of five. "Roger. Be back home in 15 minutes for dinner-over," is my reply.

ImageThe walkie-talkies were expensive by toy standards, but cheap when an at-home dad factors in peace of mind. I must admit, there's something official and cool about saying "Over ... roger ... copy" into one of 400 channels, which I have pre-selected for my kids. They're fun to play with; and yet, these high-tech toys are an important tool in my fatherhood toolkit.

It was not easy giving my kids longer (electronic) leashes so they could range farther from home. But nine-year-olds need more freedom than eight-year-olds, and the walkie-talkies allowed me to give them some freedom and still keep tabs on them.

I cannot think of any moms offhand who would buy long-range communication devices for their nine-year-old children to use electronic-kid-on-a-leash style. But let's be honest: some of the things we dads do are rather outlandish. At-home dads do things differently, and not just to sustain the stereotype that we're innovators, but because we can't escape this immutable truth: We're men, we're the adults, we're dads, and we're supposed to be in charge. My new high-tech devices speak to that truth-it's okay to play, but let's remember who's the boss.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com