Children Activities Battle Ground WA

One of the most important aspects of being a father is spending time with your kids. If you're having trouble setting aside time just for your children, read on and get some tips that could come in handy.

Ms. Christine Pollastro
Wellspring Counseling Service
(360) 695-1022
2031 Broadway, Suite C
Vancouver, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW, ACSW
Licensed in Washington
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Parenting Issues, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Tra
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. JoAnn Lusky
JoAnn Lusky LCSW, PC
(360) 735-1114
500 West Eighth Street Suite 215
Vancouver, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Washington
36 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Phobias, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Stress, Trauma/PT
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Caregivers, Step Families, Gifted, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Brynna Sibilla
Adult, Couple & Family Therapy
(503) 280-1101
1934 NE Broadway
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Oregon
17 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Stress, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's I
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Linda Tofflemire
(360) 906-1190
Vancouver, WA
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

NW Family Psychology, LLC
(360) 910-1522
NW Family Psychology, LLC4400 NE 77th Ave
Vancouver, WA
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, Relationship Issues, Divorce, Personality Disorders
Qualification
School: Brigham Young University
Year of Graduation: 2008
Years In Practice: 6 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any, Latino
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$130 - $150
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Columbia United Providers

Ms. Nancy Skanchy
Skanchy Family Counseling
(360) 980-2570
108 SE 124th Avenue
Vancouver, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Washington
15 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Parenting Issues, Stress, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. M Young
M Joy Young/Portland Lifestyle Counseling LLC
(503) 309-1163
4605 NE Fremont Street #210C
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, CPC
Licensed in Oregon
10 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Multicultural Issues, Stress, Life Transitions, Elder Abuse
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Caregivers
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
David Donald Peterson
(360) 687-2074
Battle Ground, WA
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, School, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Dr. Landon Poppleton
(360) 910-1522
NW Family Psychology, LLC4400 NE 77th Ave
Vancouver, WA
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, Relationship Issues, Divorce, Personality Disorders
Qualification
School: Brigham Young University
Year of Graduation: 2008
Years In Practice: 6 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any, Latino
Gender: Male
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children
Average Cost
$130 - $150
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Columbia United Providers

Debra Harris
(360) 571-2362
Vancouver, WA
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Data Provided by:

Children Activities

Time Together is the Best Thing

~Time Together is the Best Thing^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Colin is 11 and he loves tennis. Not long ago, his grandparents were visiting, and Colin asked if they could watch him play. So Colin and his dad, Brian, got their racquets and took grandma and grandpa to the high school courts. They all had a great time.

ImageLater, when Colin was off somewhere else, his dad Brian was talking to his father about their tennis excursion. He said, “Yeah, Colin isn’t a natural or anything, but he’s getting better. If he works hard, he could be pretty good.”

His dad’s response surprised him. That grandpa laid some wisdom on his son. He said, “Yes, but the best thing is that it’s something the two of you can do together.”

That’s a good word for all of us dads. We need balance.

Now, it’s certainly good to help our children excel in different areas of life. They are wondrous combinations of interests, tastes, gifts and abilities, and there are thousands of pursuits out there for them to learn about—sports, hobbies, music, the arts, and on and on. They develop valuable skills and learn life lessons they may not get any other way. Spending time and resources on our children to help them excel at something is a good investment. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~There's No Such Thing As Quality Time^

Written by Bruce Sallan

Date Posted: Tuesday, 28 April 2009

A Dad’s Point-Of-View

I keep learning this great lesson. It's something I know, but seem to have to experience repeatedly for it to sink into my stubborn head. With kids, there's no such thing as quality time, only quantity time.

Some people actually believe they can schedule quality time with their kids—moments when their kids will open up, reveal what’s really going on, and share. They want to schedule this time the way they schedule a business lunch. But, kids don’t work on these kinds of schedules. They open up when they’re good and ready, and it’s usually when you least expect it. This happened one weekend a couple of years ago with my younger son.

I bribed him to come skiing with me. Yeah, it’s hard to believe, but he wasn’t interested. My older son was, but my younger one got cold the first time we tried and has been against it ever since. My younger one wanted to quit early, as he was tired. Instead of berating him as I’d done in the past or just displaying my impatience, I supported him and told him he was doing great. I didn’t push him. The upshot was, both he and his brother were tired after a couple of hours.

ImageThe same thing happened the second day. Again, I supported them. Each day, as a result, we were off the slopes and back in the condo early. It was hard for me, as I so wanted my boys to enjoy winter sports.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Family Dinner ... Why?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 17 April 2009

What is your family schedule like? Does it ever seem like all the family members are going in different directions all the time? One way to fight that trend is to make dinner time a priority.

ImageIs there anything magical about having a meal together? There could be. Studies show that when families make it a habit to eat dinner together, teenagers are less likely to use drugs and alcohol and less likely to have high stress. Kids of all ages do better in school, especially reading. Eating together isn’t the only thing that makes families strong, but it is a good indicator that family members are making time together a priority.

Our friends at the Centre for Fathering in Singapore have declared an annual “Eat With Your Family Day” to remind fathers about the benefits of eating together as a family. They suggest that dads take the lead in getting everyone involved and coming up with fun things to talk about. They also suggest that dads regularly prepare a meal—a fun activity with the kids, and possibly a night off for Mom. There are more ideas at Real Men Cook .

We can’t let our families drift apart because of busy schedules, because there’s something on TV or someone calls on the phone. Once you start allowing distractions in, keeping them out becomes much more difficult. Dinnertime is one tangible way to take back time as a family, although the commitment also needs to apply beyond the dinner table.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~The Most Important Hour in Your Home?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 17 October 2008

For many years, research has been telling us that kids do better when their family has dinner together. Teenagers are less likely to use drugs and alcohol and less likely to have high stress. Kids of all ages do better in school, especially reading.

ImageAccording to a recent study at Brigham Young University , family dinners are good for dads too. Working parents who make it a priority to be home for dinner—even if they still work long hours—tend to feel greater personal success, and success in relationships with their spouses and their children. They also have more positive attitudes toward their work. On the other hand, parents who miss dinner at home because of work are more likely to feel gloomy about their professional futures.

Listen to a 7-minute NPR “Morning Edition” report from earlier this year about other research on family dinners.

Not long ago, we heard from a dad who listens to our daily radio program. He thanked us, saying, “You helped get me out of the bedroom.” He continued, “It used to be that I’d come home, get my dinner and go to the bedroom, where we have our big-screen TV. I would eat and watch TV in there, where I could relax. But now, we’re eating together as a family.”

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

There's No Such Thing As Quality Time

~Time Together is the Best Thing^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Colin is 11 and he loves tennis. Not long ago, his grandparents were visiting, and Colin asked if they could watch him play. So Colin and his dad, Brian, got their racquets and took grandma and grandpa to the high school courts. They all had a great time.

ImageLater, when Colin was off somewhere else, his dad Brian was talking to his father about their tennis excursion. He said, “Yeah, Colin isn’t a natural or anything, but he’s getting better. If he works hard, he could be pretty good.”

His dad’s response surprised him. That grandpa laid some wisdom on his son. He said, “Yes, but the best thing is that it’s something the two of you can do together.”

That’s a good word for all of us dads. We need balance.

Now, it’s certainly good to help our children excel in different areas of life. They are wondrous combinations of interests, tastes, gifts and abilities, and there are thousands of pursuits out there for them to learn about—sports, hobbies, music, the arts, and on and on. They develop valuable skills and learn life lessons they may not get any other way. Spending time and resources on our children to help them excel at something is a good investment. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~There's No Such Thing As Quality Time^

Written by Bruce Sallan

Date Posted: Tuesday, 28 April 2009

A Dad’s Point-Of-View

I keep learning this great lesson. It's something I know, but seem to have to experience repeatedly for it to sink into my stubborn head. With kids, there's no such thing as quality time, only quantity time.

Some people actually believe they can schedule quality time with their kids—moments when their kids will open up, reveal what’s really going on, and share. They want to schedule this time the way they schedule a business lunch. But, kids don’t work on these kinds of schedules. They open up when they’re good and ready, and it’s usually when you least expect it. This happened one weekend a couple of years ago with my younger son.

I bribed him to come skiing with me. Yeah, it’s hard to believe, but he wasn’t interested. My older son was, but my younger one got cold the first time we tried and has been against it ever since. My younger one wanted to quit early, as he was tired. Instead of berating him as I’d done in the past or just displaying my impatience, I supported him and told him he was doing great. I didn’t push him. The upshot was, both he and his brother were tired after a couple of hours.

ImageThe same thing happened the second day. Again, I supported them. Each day, as a result, we were off the slopes and back in the condo early. It was hard for me, as I so wanted my boys to enjoy winter sports.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Family Dinner ... Why?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 17 April 2009

What is your family schedule like? Does it ever seem like all the family members are going in different directions all the time? One way to fight that trend is to make dinner time a priority.

ImageIs there anything magical about having a meal together? There could be. Studies show that when families make it a habit to eat dinner together, teenagers are less likely to use drugs and alcohol and less likely to have high stress. Kids of all ages do better in school, especially reading. Eating together isn’t the only thing that makes families strong, but it is a good indicator that family members are making time together a priority.

Our friends at the Centre for Fathering in Singapore have declared an annual “Eat With Your Family Day” to remind fathers about the benefits of eating together as a family. They suggest that dads take the lead in getting everyone involved and coming up with fun things to talk about. They also suggest that dads regularly prepare a meal—a fun activity with the kids, and possibly a night off for Mom. There are more ideas at Real Men Cook .

We can’t let our families drift apart because of busy schedules, because there’s something on TV or someone calls on the phone. Once you start allowing distractions in, keeping them out becomes much more difficult. Dinnertime is one tangible way to take back time as a family, although the commitment also needs to apply beyond the dinner table.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~The Most Important Hour in Your Home?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 17 October 2008

For many years, research has been telling us that kids do better when their family has dinner together. Teenagers are less likely to use drugs and alcohol and less likely to have high stress. Kids of all ages do better in school, especially reading.

ImageAccording to a recent study at Brigham Young University , family dinners are good for dads too. Working parents who make it a priority to be home for dinner—even if they still work long hours—tend to feel greater personal success, and success in relationships with their spouses and their children. They also have more positive attitudes toward their work. On the other hand, parents who miss dinner at home because of work are more likely to feel gloomy about their professional futures.

Listen to a 7-minute NPR “Morning Edition” report from earlier this year about other research on family dinners.

Not long ago, we heard from a dad who listens to our daily radio program. He thanked us, saying, “You helped get me out of the bedroom.” He continued, “It used to be that I’d come home, get my dinner and go to the bedroom, where we have our big-screen TV. I would eat and watch TV in there, where I could relax. But now, we’re eating together as a family.”

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Family Dinner ... Why?

~Time Together is the Best Thing^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Colin is 11 and he loves tennis. Not long ago, his grandparents were visiting, and Colin asked if they could watch him play. So Colin and his dad, Brian, got their racquets and took grandma and grandpa to the high school courts. They all had a great time.

ImageLater, when Colin was off somewhere else, his dad Brian was talking to his father about their tennis excursion. He said, “Yeah, Colin isn’t a natural or anything, but he’s getting better. If he works hard, he could be pretty good.”

His dad’s response surprised him. That grandpa laid some wisdom on his son. He said, “Yes, but the best thing is that it’s something the two of you can do together.”

That’s a good word for all of us dads. We need balance.

Now, it’s certainly good to help our children excel in different areas of life. They are wondrous combinations of interests, tastes, gifts and abilities, and there are thousands of pursuits out there for them to learn about—sports, hobbies, music, the arts, and on and on. They develop valuable skills and learn life lessons they may not get any other way. Spending time and resources on our children to help them excel at something is a good investment. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~There's No Such Thing As Quality Time^

Written by Bruce Sallan

Date Posted: Tuesday, 28 April 2009

A Dad’s Point-Of-View

I keep learning this great lesson. It's something I know, but seem to have to experience repeatedly for it to sink into my stubborn head. With kids, there's no such thing as quality time, only quantity time.

Some people actually believe they can schedule quality time with their kids—moments when their kids will open up, reveal what’s really going on, and share. They want to schedule this time the way they schedule a business lunch. But, kids don’t work on these kinds of schedules. They open up when they’re good and ready, and it’s usually when you least expect it. This happened one weekend a couple of years ago with my younger son.

I bribed him to come skiing with me. Yeah, it’s hard to believe, but he wasn’t interested. My older son was, but my younger one got cold the first time we tried and has been against it ever since. My younger one wanted to quit early, as he was tired. Instead of berating him as I’d done in the past or just displaying my impatience, I supported him and told him he was doing great. I didn’t push him. The upshot was, both he and his brother were tired after a couple of hours.

ImageThe same thing happened the second day. Again, I supported them. Each day, as a result, we were off the slopes and back in the condo early. It was hard for me, as I so wanted my boys to enjoy winter sports.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Family Dinner ... Why?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 17 April 2009

What is your family schedule like? Does it ever seem like all the family members are going in different directions all the time? One way to fight that trend is to make dinner time a priority.

ImageIs there anything magical about having a meal together? There could be. Studies show that when families make it a habit to eat dinner together, teenagers are less likely to use drugs and alcohol and less likely to have high stress. Kids of all ages do better in school, especially reading. Eating together isn’t the only thing that makes families strong, but it is a good indicator that family members are making time together a priority.

Our friends at the Centre for Fathering in Singapore have declared an annual “Eat With Your Family Day” to remind fathers about the benefits of eating together as a family. They suggest that dads take the lead in getting everyone involved and coming up with fun things to talk about. They also suggest that dads regularly prepare a meal—a fun activity with the kids, and possibly a night off for Mom. There are more ideas at Real Men Cook .

We can’t let our families drift apart because of busy schedules, because there’s something on TV or someone calls on the phone. Once you start allowing distractions in, keeping them out becomes much more difficult. Dinnertime is one tangible way to take back time as a family, although the commitment also needs to apply beyond the dinner table.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~The Most Important Hour in Your Home?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 17 October 2008

For many years, research has been telling us that kids do better when their family has dinner together. Teenagers are less likely to use drugs and alcohol and less likely to have high stress. Kids of all ages do better in school, especially reading.

ImageAccording to a recent study at Brigham Young University , family dinners are good for dads too. Working parents who make it a priority to be home for dinner—even if they still work long hours—tend to feel greater personal success, and success in relationships with their spouses and their children. They also have more positive attitudes toward their work. On the other hand, parents who miss dinner at home because of work are more likely to feel gloomy about their professional futures.

Listen to a 7-minute NPR “Morning Edition” report from earlier this year about other research on family dinners.

Not long ago, we heard from a dad who listens to our daily radio program. He thanked us, saying, “You helped get me out of the bedroom.” He continued, “It used to be that I’d come home, get my dinner and go to the bedroom, where we have our big-screen TV. I would eat and watch TV in there, where I could relax. But now, we’re eating together as a family.”

Click here to read more from Fathers.com