Sex Education Wilsonville OR

Talking to your kids openly and honestly about sex is important. If you think it's time you have "the talk," read through the following article to get some tips on how to approach the subject.

Ms. Kelley Chimenti
Sunset Psychological & Counseling Services
(503) 292-1885
9900 SW Wilshire St., Suite 230
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Oregon
9 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Family Dysfunction, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Sexual Disorders
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Jennifer Lopas
Jennifer Lopas LCSW, LLC
(503) 250-1188
1020 SW Taylor St., Suite 250
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Oregon
10 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Physical Illness/Impairment, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trau
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Chronic Illness
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Carolyn Phillips
Carolyn Phillips, LCSW
(503) 422-9471
1536 NW 23rd Avenue
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW
Licensed in Oregon
17 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Pain Management, Parenting Issues, Phob
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Military/Veterans, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Biracial, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Joan McIlroy
(503) 768-6071
Wilsonville, OR
Practice Areas
Career Development, Clinical Mental Health, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish, French, russian

Tualatin
503-612-6912 503-612-6912 <
7059 Sw Nyberg St
Tualatin, OR
 
Mr. Christopher Tucker
Bridge City Counseling
(503) 341-5104
712 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LPC
Licensed in Oregon
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Phobias, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Personality Disorders, Attachment Disorders
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Brynna Sibilla
Adult, Couple & Family Therapy
(503) 280-1101
1934 NE Broadway
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Oregon
17 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Stress, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's I
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. M Young
M Joy Young/Portland Lifestyle Counseling LLC
(503) 309-1163
4605 NE Fremont Street #210C
Portland, OR
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, CPC
Licensed in Oregon
10 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Multicultural Issues, Stress, Life Transitions, Elder Abuse
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Caregivers
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Travis Waits
(971) 832-9925
Private Practice18650 SW Boones Ferry Road
Tualatin, OR
Specialties
Marriage, Sexual Issues, Boundaries, Spirituality, Relationship Issues, Dissociative Disorders
Qualification
School: George Fox Univerity
Year of Graduation: 2005
Years In Practice: 8 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$80 - $150
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Merle Kovash
(503) 948-5473
West Linn, OR
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Career Development, Clinical Mental Health, Aging/Gerontological, Couples & Family
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Data Provided by:

Sex Education

Protecting Your Children

~Protecting Your Children^

Written by Ken Canfield

One New Year’s weekend, three girls in their early teens were walking home from a neighborhood store. As they approached their subdivision, a young man about 18 years old exposed (flashed) himself to them. They hurried home, shocked by what occurred.

One girl’s father was home, and when he heard what had happened, he rushed out the door hoping to find and detain the young man. He was unsuccessful, but he did file a report with the police.

As the girls were being interviewed by the police officer, they showed a wide range of responses. One was in tears; another was seething with anger; the third sat quietly, dazed by what had happened. The officer said that men who do this are typically repeat offenders and usually don’t stop until they get caught.

Children are being sexually exploited world wide. In Asia and Russia, sex trafficking of youth plagues the culture. In Europe and North America, a steady barrage of graphic sexual media strips the innocence of youth. Perhaps most disconcerting are news reports that some victims from the tsunami are being sexually molested in refugee camps.

ImageAs fathers, we need to speak up against sexual abuse and inappropriate sexual behavior. The pendulum of protection needs to swing toward the security of our children. Creating an environment of sexual safety and consideration will be a huge boost to them as they seek to make wise choices and navigate the waters of their culture. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Let's Talk About S-E-X^

Written by Walt Mueller

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

I could hardly believe my daughter's announcement: her second grade classmate was "having S-E-X" (yes, she tried to spare us some shock by spelling the three-letter word!). When pressed by her surprised parents, my daughter asserted, "Yes, Dad, she told us on the playground. When she goes home from school, she goes next door to the neighbor's house. He's in third grade. They take off their clothes, get under the covers, and kiss and stuff."

In my wildest imagination I never believed that the "big talk" would be initiated by my daughter ... let alone when she was seven years old! I was sure I had at least a few more years before "talk time." Suddenly I was faced with the question: "What can I do as a father to help my children develop healthy attitudes and practices about sex and sexuality?" Here are some suggestions for all of us dads to consider as we take on this exciting and necessary challenge.

ImageFirst, recognize that children are having sex at earlier ages, and that your kids are not immune to sexual temptation. Imagine ten chairs lined up side by side in your living room. In one chair sits your teenager while his or her peers sit in the other nine. Assuming they will answer honestly, you ask everyone who has ever had sexual intercourse to please stand up. How many do you think will stand? If they're all ninth graders, four will stand. If all seniors, 7 out of 10 girls and 8 out of 10 guys will get up out of their seats. If those ten are college students, nine will stand.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teaching Kids about Sex^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

How important is it for you, as a father, to talk honestly and openly with your children about sex? We've heard too many stories of children whose fathers completely ignored this area of their lives, and who struggled because of it. We can't afford to let our children learn about sex on their own. Maybe our fathers could, but we can't.

When the issue comes up, our children are watching and waiting for our response. And, if we don't see it come up, we may have to bring it up. It may be awkward, but we've got to be open with both our sons and daughters to affirm them toward healthy sexuality.

Let's talk specifics:

First, make sure you have the pertinent facts. This includes everything-from the basic "birds and bees" mechanics, to the threat of HIV, to the way our culture has twisted healthy sexuality. Talk about words like rape, harassment, and abuse. Be factual and truthful. Do a little research, if need be.

ImageSecond, visit the topic of sexuality early and often. Make your conversation age appropriate, but don't wait until they reach puberty. Healthy sex education starts with toddlers when you accurately name the body parts. As they get older, look for teachable moments when you can ask a reasonable question or express your perspective. Check in one-on-one to see if they have questions or concerns. Make yourself available as a resource, and let them know you care.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Don't Be Naive About Your Kids & Sex^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

A friend of mine who was an outstanding youth leader was dumbfounded when his daughter told him one day that she was pregnant. He had given dozens of talks about sex and relationships, yet somehow failed to recognize the needs of his own daughter.

Another friend was the campus minister at a private conservative university in the Midwest. He provided individual counseling to students, and one year he had counseled twenty female students who had problems related to being sexually involved with their boyfriends. During their counseling sessions, he discovered that none of the twenty coeds had a satisfying relationship with their dad. All described their father as either absent or distant.

You might assume your children are different from the rest of the world when it comes to sexual activity. But statistics show this isn’t the case.

ImageAmong eighteen-year-olds, 65 percent of girls and 68 percent of boys have experienced sexual intercourse. You’ll find that the percentages start pretty low for fifteen-year-olds, then rise rapidly by age nineteen. Are you open to the possibility that your son or daughter could be in that percentage?

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Share Your Attitudes About Sex^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

Are you getting ready for that big birds-and-the-bees talk, dad? That talk is important, but you can't stop there.

A study published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence looked at 750 inner-city African American youth between the ages of 14 and 17. The researchers concluded that sexual behavior among the teens could be predicted with some accuracy based on each child's perceptions of his father's attitudes about sex.

To put this in more friendly terms, these teenagers' sexual activity was strongly influenced by what they knew their fathers' believed about sex. And it was true for fathers much more than mothers. Dads, we determine the child's sex at conception, and we have a huge part in shaping the child's sexual expression later on.

ImageWe should realize that this is our role whether we want it or not. If it's an uncomfortable topic and you avoid talking about it, that's the message you're sending to your child about sex. You don't care about what happens, and she needs to make her own decisions—based on what others are saying and doing.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Let's Talk About S-E-X

~Protecting Your Children^

Written by Ken Canfield

One New Year’s weekend, three girls in their early teens were walking home from a neighborhood store. As they approached their subdivision, a young man about 18 years old exposed (flashed) himself to them. They hurried home, shocked by what occurred.

One girl’s father was home, and when he heard what had happened, he rushed out the door hoping to find and detain the young man. He was unsuccessful, but he did file a report with the police.

As the girls were being interviewed by the police officer, they showed a wide range of responses. One was in tears; another was seething with anger; the third sat quietly, dazed by what had happened. The officer said that men who do this are typically repeat offenders and usually don’t stop until they get caught.

Children are being sexually exploited world wide. In Asia and Russia, sex trafficking of youth plagues the culture. In Europe and North America, a steady barrage of graphic sexual media strips the innocence of youth. Perhaps most disconcerting are news reports that some victims from the tsunami are being sexually molested in refugee camps.

ImageAs fathers, we need to speak up against sexual abuse and inappropriate sexual behavior. The pendulum of protection needs to swing toward the security of our children. Creating an environment of sexual safety and consideration will be a huge boost to them as they seek to make wise choices and navigate the waters of their culture. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Let's Talk About S-E-X^

Written by Walt Mueller

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

I could hardly believe my daughter's announcement: her second grade classmate was "having S-E-X" (yes, she tried to spare us some shock by spelling the three-letter word!). When pressed by her surprised parents, my daughter asserted, "Yes, Dad, she told us on the playground. When she goes home from school, she goes next door to the neighbor's house. He's in third grade. They take off their clothes, get under the covers, and kiss and stuff."

In my wildest imagination I never believed that the "big talk" would be initiated by my daughter ... let alone when she was seven years old! I was sure I had at least a few more years before "talk time." Suddenly I was faced with the question: "What can I do as a father to help my children develop healthy attitudes and practices about sex and sexuality?" Here are some suggestions for all of us dads to consider as we take on this exciting and necessary challenge.

ImageFirst, recognize that children are having sex at earlier ages, and that your kids are not immune to sexual temptation. Imagine ten chairs lined up side by side in your living room. In one chair sits your teenager while his or her peers sit in the other nine. Assuming they will answer honestly, you ask everyone who has ever had sexual intercourse to please stand up. How many do you think will stand? If they're all ninth graders, four will stand. If all seniors, 7 out of 10 girls and 8 out of 10 guys will get up out of their seats. If those ten are college students, nine will stand.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teaching Kids about Sex^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

How important is it for you, as a father, to talk honestly and openly with your children about sex? We've heard too many stories of children whose fathers completely ignored this area of their lives, and who struggled because of it. We can't afford to let our children learn about sex on their own. Maybe our fathers could, but we can't.

When the issue comes up, our children are watching and waiting for our response. And, if we don't see it come up, we may have to bring it up. It may be awkward, but we've got to be open with both our sons and daughters to affirm them toward healthy sexuality.

Let's talk specifics:

First, make sure you have the pertinent facts. This includes everything-from the basic "birds and bees" mechanics, to the threat of HIV, to the way our culture has twisted healthy sexuality. Talk about words like rape, harassment, and abuse. Be factual and truthful. Do a little research, if need be.

ImageSecond, visit the topic of sexuality early and often. Make your conversation age appropriate, but don't wait until they reach puberty. Healthy sex education starts with toddlers when you accurately name the body parts. As they get older, look for teachable moments when you can ask a reasonable question or express your perspective. Check in one-on-one to see if they have questions or concerns. Make yourself available as a resource, and let them know you care.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Don't Be Naive About Your Kids & Sex^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

A friend of mine who was an outstanding youth leader was dumbfounded when his daughter told him one day that she was pregnant. He had given dozens of talks about sex and relationships, yet somehow failed to recognize the needs of his own daughter.

Another friend was the campus minister at a private conservative university in the Midwest. He provided individual counseling to students, and one year he had counseled twenty female students who had problems related to being sexually involved with their boyfriends. During their counseling sessions, he discovered that none of the twenty coeds had a satisfying relationship with their dad. All described their father as either absent or distant.

You might assume your children are different from the rest of the world when it comes to sexual activity. But statistics show this isn’t the case.

ImageAmong eighteen-year-olds, 65 percent of girls and 68 percent of boys have experienced sexual intercourse. You’ll find that the percentages start pretty low for fifteen-year-olds, then rise rapidly by age nineteen. Are you open to the possibility that your son or daughter could be in that percentage?

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Share Your Attitudes About Sex^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

Are you getting ready for that big birds-and-the-bees talk, dad? That talk is important, but you can't stop there.

A study published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence looked at 750 inner-city African American youth between the ages of 14 and 17. The researchers concluded that sexual behavior among the teens could be predicted with some accuracy based on each child's perceptions of his father's attitudes about sex.

To put this in more friendly terms, these teenagers' sexual activity was strongly influenced by what they knew their fathers' believed about sex. And it was true for fathers much more than mothers. Dads, we determine the child's sex at conception, and we have a huge part in shaping the child's sexual expression later on.

ImageWe should realize that this is our role whether we want it or not. If it's an uncomfortable topic and you avoid talking about it, that's the message you're sending to your child about sex. You don't care about what happens, and she needs to make her own decisions—based on what others are saying and doing.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Teaching Kids about Sex

~Protecting Your Children^

Written by Ken Canfield

One New Year’s weekend, three girls in their early teens were walking home from a neighborhood store. As they approached their subdivision, a young man about 18 years old exposed (flashed) himself to them. They hurried home, shocked by what occurred.

One girl’s father was home, and when he heard what had happened, he rushed out the door hoping to find and detain the young man. He was unsuccessful, but he did file a report with the police.

As the girls were being interviewed by the police officer, they showed a wide range of responses. One was in tears; another was seething with anger; the third sat quietly, dazed by what had happened. The officer said that men who do this are typically repeat offenders and usually don’t stop until they get caught.

Children are being sexually exploited world wide. In Asia and Russia, sex trafficking of youth plagues the culture. In Europe and North America, a steady barrage of graphic sexual media strips the innocence of youth. Perhaps most disconcerting are news reports that some victims from the tsunami are being sexually molested in refugee camps.

ImageAs fathers, we need to speak up against sexual abuse and inappropriate sexual behavior. The pendulum of protection needs to swing toward the security of our children. Creating an environment of sexual safety and consideration will be a huge boost to them as they seek to make wise choices and navigate the waters of their culture. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Let's Talk About S-E-X^

Written by Walt Mueller

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

I could hardly believe my daughter's announcement: her second grade classmate was "having S-E-X" (yes, she tried to spare us some shock by spelling the three-letter word!). When pressed by her surprised parents, my daughter asserted, "Yes, Dad, she told us on the playground. When she goes home from school, she goes next door to the neighbor's house. He's in third grade. They take off their clothes, get under the covers, and kiss and stuff."

In my wildest imagination I never believed that the "big talk" would be initiated by my daughter ... let alone when she was seven years old! I was sure I had at least a few more years before "talk time." Suddenly I was faced with the question: "What can I do as a father to help my children develop healthy attitudes and practices about sex and sexuality?" Here are some suggestions for all of us dads to consider as we take on this exciting and necessary challenge.

ImageFirst, recognize that children are having sex at earlier ages, and that your kids are not immune to sexual temptation. Imagine ten chairs lined up side by side in your living room. In one chair sits your teenager while his or her peers sit in the other nine. Assuming they will answer honestly, you ask everyone who has ever had sexual intercourse to please stand up. How many do you think will stand? If they're all ninth graders, four will stand. If all seniors, 7 out of 10 girls and 8 out of 10 guys will get up out of their seats. If those ten are college students, nine will stand.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teaching Kids about Sex^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

How important is it for you, as a father, to talk honestly and openly with your children about sex? We've heard too many stories of children whose fathers completely ignored this area of their lives, and who struggled because of it. We can't afford to let our children learn about sex on their own. Maybe our fathers could, but we can't.

When the issue comes up, our children are watching and waiting for our response. And, if we don't see it come up, we may have to bring it up. It may be awkward, but we've got to be open with both our sons and daughters to affirm them toward healthy sexuality.

Let's talk specifics:

First, make sure you have the pertinent facts. This includes everything-from the basic "birds and bees" mechanics, to the threat of HIV, to the way our culture has twisted healthy sexuality. Talk about words like rape, harassment, and abuse. Be factual and truthful. Do a little research, if need be.

ImageSecond, visit the topic of sexuality early and often. Make your conversation age appropriate, but don't wait until they reach puberty. Healthy sex education starts with toddlers when you accurately name the body parts. As they get older, look for teachable moments when you can ask a reasonable question or express your perspective. Check in one-on-one to see if they have questions or concerns. Make yourself available as a resource, and let them know you care.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Don't Be Naive About Your Kids & Sex^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Friday, 27 April 2007

A friend of mine who was an outstanding youth leader was dumbfounded when his daughter told him one day that she was pregnant. He had given dozens of talks about sex and relationships, yet somehow failed to recognize the needs of his own daughter.

Another friend was the campus minister at a private conservative university in the Midwest. He provided individual counseling to students, and one year he had counseled twenty female students who had problems related to being sexually involved with their boyfriends. During their counseling sessions, he discovered that none of the twenty coeds had a satisfying relationship with their dad. All described their father as either absent or distant.

You might assume your children are different from the rest of the world when it comes to sexual activity. But statistics show this isn’t the case.

ImageAmong eighteen-year-olds, 65 percent of girls and 68 percent of boys have experienced sexual intercourse. You’ll find that the percentages start pretty low for fifteen-year-olds, then rise rapidly by age nineteen. Are you open to the possibility that your son or daughter could be in that percentage?

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Share Your Attitudes About Sex^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

Are you getting ready for that big birds-and-the-bees talk, dad? That talk is important, but you can't stop there.

A study published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence looked at 750 inner-city African American youth between the ages of 14 and 17. The researchers concluded that sexual behavior among the teens could be predicted with some accuracy based on each child's perceptions of his father's attitudes about sex.

To put this in more friendly terms, these teenagers' sexual activity was strongly influenced by what they knew their fathers' believed about sex. And it was true for fathers much more than mothers. Dads, we determine the child's sex at conception, and we have a huge part in shaping the child's sexual expression later on.

ImageWe should realize that this is our role whether we want it or not. If it's an uncomfortable topic and you avoid talking about it, that's the message you're sending to your child about sex. You don't care about what happens, and she needs to make her own decisions—based on what others are saying and doing.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

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