Divorce Support Groups Kent OH

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children.

Ms. Susan Calaway
Susan Calaway & Associates Counseling Services
(330) 798-1220
2161 Eastwood Ave.
Akron, OH
Credentials
Credentials: LISW
Licensed in Ohio
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Child Abuse and Neglect, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Inte
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Caregivers, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Mary Malek
Renew Psychological Services
(330) 655-2674
72 Village Way Suite 1A
Hudson, OH
Credentials
Credentials: PhD
Licensed in Ohio
15 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Physical Illness/Impairment, Spiritual/Religious Concerns,
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Military/Veterans, Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Cynthia Rudick
Cynthia D. Rudick, Ph.D.
(330) 492-2006
3722 Whipple Avenue N.W.
Canton, OH
Credentials
Credentials: Ph.D., LPCC
Licensed in Ohio
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Obsess
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Military/Veterans, Caregivers, Step Families, Gifted, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Grandparents, Obese or Overweight
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Jo Ann Tercek-Mowrey
(330) 296-5552
Ravenna, OH
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, School, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Robert Martin White
(330) 733-7993
Akron, OH
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Dr. Christine Elliott
Renew Psychological Services
(330) 655-2674
72 Village Way, Suite 1A
Hudson, OH
Credentials
Credentials: Ph.D.
Licensed in Ohio
18 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Spiritual/Religious Concerns, Stress, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues, Postpartum Depression
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Step Families, Chronic Illness, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Holistic Psychological Practice
(440) 821-0279
10298 Andover Drive
Twinsburg, OH
Services
Wellness Training, Substance Abuse, Stress Management, Psychotherapy, Pain Management, Mind/Body Medicine, Meditation, Hypnosis/Hypnotherapy, Family Therapy, Energy Medicine, EFT, EMDR, Dreamwork Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, Coaching, Addiction
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Diana Bala
(330) 630-9223
Tallmadge, OH
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Collin Myers
(330) 940-2522
Cuyahoga Falls, OH
Practice Areas
Career Development, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, School
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Linda Sims
(330) 375-3462
Akron, OH
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Aging/Gerontological, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Data Provided by:

Divorce Support Groups

Five Goals for Live-Away Dads

~Five Goals for Live-Away Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

A peaceful divorce? Possibly. A pain-free divorce? That’s exceedingly rare. The adjustments for dad, mom and kids are major.

William Klatte has written an insightful book called Live-Away Dads . In it, he suggests five beneficial actions you can take: goals you can focus on when you don’t know what to do next.

ImageFirst, keep your promises. Your kids are depending on you, and kept promises are an important way you can create stability during a time of uncertainty. Each broken promise, no matter how small, reduces their trust in you a little bit, and can really erode over time. So, think before you speak, and do everything you can to keep your word.

Second, show your kids that you’ll be okay. For them to feel confident and at peace, they have to see that you are. If it’s obvious that you’re devastated, they’ll be insecure. That doesn’t mean you never show weaknesses; honesty is critical. But show them in words and actions that you can make it through the tough times.

Also, support their mother. Impossible, you say? It’s a vital element of any healthy family—intact or otherwise. Recognize that cutting her down lowers you in the long run. Help them honor her as their mother. Work out disagreements in private. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

One summer, pitcher Terry Mulholland was selected as the starting pitcher for the National League in the All-Star Game. Mulholland planned to reject the invitation and pass up a chance to pitch in the summer classic. Why? Because Terry is also a father. He's a long-distance dad who saw the three-day break as a chance to catch up with his young son, Tyler. They'd planned a father-son fishing trip, and Terry was determined to keep his word. As it turned out, Mulholland's manager gave him another day off, so he was able to pitch in the game and then fly to Arizona to take Tyler fishing.

There are such men who are recognized for wanting to be successful in the eyes of their kids, despite the distance. But for many long-distance dads, life is anything but glorious. Sometimes it seems you receive nothing but contempt from society at large.

ImageNO ACCESS!

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children. You must look at the men out there who do live with their children-but aren't really involved in their lives—and just shake your head. The movie Mrs. Doubtfire helped to surface a lot of these complex, difficult emotions. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Daddy's Dream^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

A letter from a dad named Monty has touched on a rather challenging dilemma for the National Center for Fathering: how can we talk and write about healthy fathering when so many dads out there rarely even have the opportunity to be an effective father?

Monty is a twice-divorced dad who wrote this:

I appreciate your magazine because it fills a void prevalent in our society, the raising and training of fathers. But ... the anguish I feel in not being present for my children escalates when I read about ideal fathering. And well it is that you should continue writing. But chances are I’m one of many displaced fathers. Whether we’re cowards or not ... thoughts on ideal fathering do not help.

ImageWe know that not all dads can understand all the frustrations that divorced dads may go through—men who still strive to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Other dads can only imagine what it must be like to deal with custody, child support, or other conflicts that come with a divorce.

You may feel pain and regret; you may be angry and for good reason; you may feel like your insides are raw with stinging sadness. Maybe the best advice is to do all you can to turn negative energy into positive. Use your adrenaline from negative emotions to claim a firm resolve be the father your children need. Channel moments of regret into creative planning times for connecting positively with your children.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering

~Five Goals for Live-Away Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

A peaceful divorce? Possibly. A pain-free divorce? That’s exceedingly rare. The adjustments for dad, mom and kids are major.

William Klatte has written an insightful book called Live-Away Dads . In it, he suggests five beneficial actions you can take: goals you can focus on when you don’t know what to do next.

ImageFirst, keep your promises. Your kids are depending on you, and kept promises are an important way you can create stability during a time of uncertainty. Each broken promise, no matter how small, reduces their trust in you a little bit, and can really erode over time. So, think before you speak, and do everything you can to keep your word.

Second, show your kids that you’ll be okay. For them to feel confident and at peace, they have to see that you are. If it’s obvious that you’re devastated, they’ll be insecure. That doesn’t mean you never show weaknesses; honesty is critical. But show them in words and actions that you can make it through the tough times.

Also, support their mother. Impossible, you say? It’s a vital element of any healthy family—intact or otherwise. Recognize that cutting her down lowers you in the long run. Help them honor her as their mother. Work out disagreements in private. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

One summer, pitcher Terry Mulholland was selected as the starting pitcher for the National League in the All-Star Game. Mulholland planned to reject the invitation and pass up a chance to pitch in the summer classic. Why? Because Terry is also a father. He's a long-distance dad who saw the three-day break as a chance to catch up with his young son, Tyler. They'd planned a father-son fishing trip, and Terry was determined to keep his word. As it turned out, Mulholland's manager gave him another day off, so he was able to pitch in the game and then fly to Arizona to take Tyler fishing.

There are such men who are recognized for wanting to be successful in the eyes of their kids, despite the distance. But for many long-distance dads, life is anything but glorious. Sometimes it seems you receive nothing but contempt from society at large.

ImageNO ACCESS!

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children. You must look at the men out there who do live with their children-but aren't really involved in their lives—and just shake your head. The movie Mrs. Doubtfire helped to surface a lot of these complex, difficult emotions. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Daddy's Dream^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

A letter from a dad named Monty has touched on a rather challenging dilemma for the National Center for Fathering: how can we talk and write about healthy fathering when so many dads out there rarely even have the opportunity to be an effective father?

Monty is a twice-divorced dad who wrote this:

I appreciate your magazine because it fills a void prevalent in our society, the raising and training of fathers. But ... the anguish I feel in not being present for my children escalates when I read about ideal fathering. And well it is that you should continue writing. But chances are I’m one of many displaced fathers. Whether we’re cowards or not ... thoughts on ideal fathering do not help.

ImageWe know that not all dads can understand all the frustrations that divorced dads may go through—men who still strive to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Other dads can only imagine what it must be like to deal with custody, child support, or other conflicts that come with a divorce.

You may feel pain and regret; you may be angry and for good reason; you may feel like your insides are raw with stinging sadness. Maybe the best advice is to do all you can to turn negative energy into positive. Use your adrenaline from negative emotions to claim a firm resolve be the father your children need. Channel moments of regret into creative planning times for connecting positively with your children.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Daddy's Dream

~Five Goals for Live-Away Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

A peaceful divorce? Possibly. A pain-free divorce? That’s exceedingly rare. The adjustments for dad, mom and kids are major.

William Klatte has written an insightful book called Live-Away Dads . In it, he suggests five beneficial actions you can take: goals you can focus on when you don’t know what to do next.

ImageFirst, keep your promises. Your kids are depending on you, and kept promises are an important way you can create stability during a time of uncertainty. Each broken promise, no matter how small, reduces their trust in you a little bit, and can really erode over time. So, think before you speak, and do everything you can to keep your word.

Second, show your kids that you’ll be okay. For them to feel confident and at peace, they have to see that you are. If it’s obvious that you’re devastated, they’ll be insecure. That doesn’t mean you never show weaknesses; honesty is critical. But show them in words and actions that you can make it through the tough times.

Also, support their mother. Impossible, you say? It’s a vital element of any healthy family—intact or otherwise. Recognize that cutting her down lowers you in the long run. Help them honor her as their mother. Work out disagreements in private. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

One summer, pitcher Terry Mulholland was selected as the starting pitcher for the National League in the All-Star Game. Mulholland planned to reject the invitation and pass up a chance to pitch in the summer classic. Why? Because Terry is also a father. He's a long-distance dad who saw the three-day break as a chance to catch up with his young son, Tyler. They'd planned a father-son fishing trip, and Terry was determined to keep his word. As it turned out, Mulholland's manager gave him another day off, so he was able to pitch in the game and then fly to Arizona to take Tyler fishing.

There are such men who are recognized for wanting to be successful in the eyes of their kids, despite the distance. But for many long-distance dads, life is anything but glorious. Sometimes it seems you receive nothing but contempt from society at large.

ImageNO ACCESS!

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children. You must look at the men out there who do live with their children-but aren't really involved in their lives—and just shake your head. The movie Mrs. Doubtfire helped to surface a lot of these complex, difficult emotions. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Daddy's Dream^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

A letter from a dad named Monty has touched on a rather challenging dilemma for the National Center for Fathering: how can we talk and write about healthy fathering when so many dads out there rarely even have the opportunity to be an effective father?

Monty is a twice-divorced dad who wrote this:

I appreciate your magazine because it fills a void prevalent in our society, the raising and training of fathers. But ... the anguish I feel in not being present for my children escalates when I read about ideal fathering. And well it is that you should continue writing. But chances are I’m one of many displaced fathers. Whether we’re cowards or not ... thoughts on ideal fathering do not help.

ImageWe know that not all dads can understand all the frustrations that divorced dads may go through—men who still strive to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Other dads can only imagine what it must be like to deal with custody, child support, or other conflicts that come with a divorce.

You may feel pain and regret; you may be angry and for good reason; you may feel like your insides are raw with stinging sadness. Maybe the best advice is to do all you can to turn negative energy into positive. Use your adrenaline from negative emotions to claim a firm resolve be the father your children need. Channel moments of regret into creative planning times for connecting positively with your children.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com