Divorce Support Groups Clayton NC

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children.

Ms. Tara Mirkar
Tara Mirkar, LCSW
(919) 455-7169
1405 Hillsborough Street
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
13 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interper
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Military/Veterans, Offenders/Perpetrators, Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Jean Gross
Jean S. Gross
(919) 783-7077
4601 Lake Boone Trail Suite 2C
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
32 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Danielle Tanaka
Danielle Tanaka, MSW, LCSW, PLLC
(919) 285-8417
3717 National Drive
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
22 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Behavioral Problems, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Anger Management, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families, Obese or Overweight
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Robert Cooke, D.Min., Th.M., M.Div.
919-845-9977 ext 202
Church at Clayton Crossings,11407 US Hwy 70 West
Clayton, NC
Specialties
Anxiety or Fears,Chronic Pain or Illness,Depression,Divorce,Life Coaching,Loss or Grief,OCD,Relationship Issues,Spirituality
Gender
Male
Education
Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Counseling from Columbia Theological Seminary and Care & Counseling Center of Georgia.Th.M. and M.Div. from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.BA in Spanish and Religion from Gardner-Webb University.
Insurance
Yes
Membership Organizations
Triangle Pastoral Counseling

Laura Boisvert Boyd
(919) 585-5042
223 Hiighway 70 W
Garner, NC
Specialties
Anxiety or Fears, Depression, Divorce, Bipolar Disorder
Qualification
School: North Carolina State University
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 9 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Preteens / Tweens (11 to 13),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$90 - $120
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: BlueCross and/or BlueShield

Mrs. Lisa Caprioli
Caprioli Counseling
(919) 928-5123
827 North Bloodworth Street Suite A
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
11 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Kim Mitchell
Creative Solutions Counseling, LLC
(919) 782-0272
5561-201 McNeely Drive
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder,
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Disabled, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Rhonda Kaalund
(919) 550-3333
Clayton, NC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

LoriAnn Stretch
(919) 359-9070
Clayton, NC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, Supervision
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Justin Acebo
Garner, NC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Data Provided by:

Divorce Support Groups

Five Goals for Live-Away Dads

~Five Goals for Live-Away Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

A peaceful divorce? Possibly. A pain-free divorce? That’s exceedingly rare. The adjustments for dad, mom and kids are major.

William Klatte has written an insightful book called Live-Away Dads . In it, he suggests five beneficial actions you can take: goals you can focus on when you don’t know what to do next.

ImageFirst, keep your promises. Your kids are depending on you, and kept promises are an important way you can create stability during a time of uncertainty. Each broken promise, no matter how small, reduces their trust in you a little bit, and can really erode over time. So, think before you speak, and do everything you can to keep your word.

Second, show your kids that you’ll be okay. For them to feel confident and at peace, they have to see that you are. If it’s obvious that you’re devastated, they’ll be insecure. That doesn’t mean you never show weaknesses; honesty is critical. But show them in words and actions that you can make it through the tough times.

Also, support their mother. Impossible, you say? It’s a vital element of any healthy family—intact or otherwise. Recognize that cutting her down lowers you in the long run. Help them honor her as their mother. Work out disagreements in private. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

One summer, pitcher Terry Mulholland was selected as the starting pitcher for the National League in the All-Star Game. Mulholland planned to reject the invitation and pass up a chance to pitch in the summer classic. Why? Because Terry is also a father. He's a long-distance dad who saw the three-day break as a chance to catch up with his young son, Tyler. They'd planned a father-son fishing trip, and Terry was determined to keep his word. As it turned out, Mulholland's manager gave him another day off, so he was able to pitch in the game and then fly to Arizona to take Tyler fishing.

There are such men who are recognized for wanting to be successful in the eyes of their kids, despite the distance. But for many long-distance dads, life is anything but glorious. Sometimes it seems you receive nothing but contempt from society at large.

ImageNO ACCESS!

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children. You must look at the men out there who do live with their children-but aren't really involved in their lives—and just shake your head. The movie Mrs. Doubtfire helped to surface a lot of these complex, difficult emotions. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Daddy's Dream^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

A letter from a dad named Monty has touched on a rather challenging dilemma for the National Center for Fathering: how can we talk and write about healthy fathering when so many dads out there rarely even have the opportunity to be an effective father?

Monty is a twice-divorced dad who wrote this:

I appreciate your magazine because it fills a void prevalent in our society, the raising and training of fathers. But ... the anguish I feel in not being present for my children escalates when I read about ideal fathering. And well it is that you should continue writing. But chances are I’m one of many displaced fathers. Whether we’re cowards or not ... thoughts on ideal fathering do not help.

ImageWe know that not all dads can understand all the frustrations that divorced dads may go through—men who still strive to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Other dads can only imagine what it must be like to deal with custody, child support, or other conflicts that come with a divorce.

You may feel pain and regret; you may be angry and for good reason; you may feel like your insides are raw with stinging sadness. Maybe the best advice is to do all you can to turn negative energy into positive. Use your adrenaline from negative emotions to claim a firm resolve be the father your children need. Channel moments of regret into creative planning times for connecting positively with your children.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering

~Five Goals for Live-Away Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

A peaceful divorce? Possibly. A pain-free divorce? That’s exceedingly rare. The adjustments for dad, mom and kids are major.

William Klatte has written an insightful book called Live-Away Dads . In it, he suggests five beneficial actions you can take: goals you can focus on when you don’t know what to do next.

ImageFirst, keep your promises. Your kids are depending on you, and kept promises are an important way you can create stability during a time of uncertainty. Each broken promise, no matter how small, reduces their trust in you a little bit, and can really erode over time. So, think before you speak, and do everything you can to keep your word.

Second, show your kids that you’ll be okay. For them to feel confident and at peace, they have to see that you are. If it’s obvious that you’re devastated, they’ll be insecure. That doesn’t mean you never show weaknesses; honesty is critical. But show them in words and actions that you can make it through the tough times.

Also, support their mother. Impossible, you say? It’s a vital element of any healthy family—intact or otherwise. Recognize that cutting her down lowers you in the long run. Help them honor her as their mother. Work out disagreements in private. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

One summer, pitcher Terry Mulholland was selected as the starting pitcher for the National League in the All-Star Game. Mulholland planned to reject the invitation and pass up a chance to pitch in the summer classic. Why? Because Terry is also a father. He's a long-distance dad who saw the three-day break as a chance to catch up with his young son, Tyler. They'd planned a father-son fishing trip, and Terry was determined to keep his word. As it turned out, Mulholland's manager gave him another day off, so he was able to pitch in the game and then fly to Arizona to take Tyler fishing.

There are such men who are recognized for wanting to be successful in the eyes of their kids, despite the distance. But for many long-distance dads, life is anything but glorious. Sometimes it seems you receive nothing but contempt from society at large.

ImageNO ACCESS!

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children. You must look at the men out there who do live with their children-but aren't really involved in their lives—and just shake your head. The movie Mrs. Doubtfire helped to surface a lot of these complex, difficult emotions. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Daddy's Dream^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

A letter from a dad named Monty has touched on a rather challenging dilemma for the National Center for Fathering: how can we talk and write about healthy fathering when so many dads out there rarely even have the opportunity to be an effective father?

Monty is a twice-divorced dad who wrote this:

I appreciate your magazine because it fills a void prevalent in our society, the raising and training of fathers. But ... the anguish I feel in not being present for my children escalates when I read about ideal fathering. And well it is that you should continue writing. But chances are I’m one of many displaced fathers. Whether we’re cowards or not ... thoughts on ideal fathering do not help.

ImageWe know that not all dads can understand all the frustrations that divorced dads may go through—men who still strive to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Other dads can only imagine what it must be like to deal with custody, child support, or other conflicts that come with a divorce.

You may feel pain and regret; you may be angry and for good reason; you may feel like your insides are raw with stinging sadness. Maybe the best advice is to do all you can to turn negative energy into positive. Use your adrenaline from negative emotions to claim a firm resolve be the father your children need. Channel moments of regret into creative planning times for connecting positively with your children.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Daddy's Dream

~Five Goals for Live-Away Dads^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

A peaceful divorce? Possibly. A pain-free divorce? That’s exceedingly rare. The adjustments for dad, mom and kids are major.

William Klatte has written an insightful book called Live-Away Dads . In it, he suggests five beneficial actions you can take: goals you can focus on when you don’t know what to do next.

ImageFirst, keep your promises. Your kids are depending on you, and kept promises are an important way you can create stability during a time of uncertainty. Each broken promise, no matter how small, reduces their trust in you a little bit, and can really erode over time. So, think before you speak, and do everything you can to keep your word.

Second, show your kids that you’ll be okay. For them to feel confident and at peace, they have to see that you are. If it’s obvious that you’re devastated, they’ll be insecure. That doesn’t mean you never show weaknesses; honesty is critical. But show them in words and actions that you can make it through the tough times.

Also, support their mother. Impossible, you say? It’s a vital element of any healthy family—intact or otherwise. Recognize that cutting her down lowers you in the long run. Help them honor her as their mother. Work out disagreements in private. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Making the Most of Long-Distance Fathering^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

One summer, pitcher Terry Mulholland was selected as the starting pitcher for the National League in the All-Star Game. Mulholland planned to reject the invitation and pass up a chance to pitch in the summer classic. Why? Because Terry is also a father. He's a long-distance dad who saw the three-day break as a chance to catch up with his young son, Tyler. They'd planned a father-son fishing trip, and Terry was determined to keep his word. As it turned out, Mulholland's manager gave him another day off, so he was able to pitch in the game and then fly to Arizona to take Tyler fishing.

There are such men who are recognized for wanting to be successful in the eyes of their kids, despite the distance. But for many long-distance dads, life is anything but glorious. Sometimes it seems you receive nothing but contempt from society at large.

ImageNO ACCESS!

The one obstacle all non-custodial fathers must hurdle is access: seeing your children at any time and participating in the daily happenings of their lives. For many single dads, there's nothing you wouldn't give to have free access to your children. You must look at the men out there who do live with their children-but aren't really involved in their lives—and just shake your head. The movie Mrs. Doubtfire helped to surface a lot of these complex, difficult emotions. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Daddy's Dream^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

A letter from a dad named Monty has touched on a rather challenging dilemma for the National Center for Fathering: how can we talk and write about healthy fathering when so many dads out there rarely even have the opportunity to be an effective father?

Monty is a twice-divorced dad who wrote this:

I appreciate your magazine because it fills a void prevalent in our society, the raising and training of fathers. But ... the anguish I feel in not being present for my children escalates when I read about ideal fathering. And well it is that you should continue writing. But chances are I’m one of many displaced fathers. Whether we’re cowards or not ... thoughts on ideal fathering do not help.

ImageWe know that not all dads can understand all the frustrations that divorced dads may go through—men who still strive to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Other dads can only imagine what it must be like to deal with custody, child support, or other conflicts that come with a divorce.

You may feel pain and regret; you may be angry and for good reason; you may feel like your insides are raw with stinging sadness. Maybe the best advice is to do all you can to turn negative energy into positive. Use your adrenaline from negative emotions to claim a firm resolve be the father your children need. Channel moments of regret into creative planning times for connecting positively with your children.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Local Events

NCAAHPERD- North Carolina Alliance for Athletics, Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance's 67th Annual Convention
Dates: 11/20/2014 – 11/22/2014
Location:
Venue TBD Raleigh
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