Family Therapist Sulphur Springs TX

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Making your Marriage Work. You will find informative articles about Making your Marriage Work, including "Making your Marriage Work". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Sulphur Springs, TX that can help answer your questions about Making your Marriage Work.

Mrs. Judy Redington
Judy G. Redington
(972) 233-5277
12800 Hillcrest Rd #218
Dallas, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, ACSW
Licensed in Texas
35 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Sondra Kaplan
Sondra Kaplan, LCSW
(713) 780-1478
58558 Westheimer, Suite 706
Houston, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
31 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Forensic, Grief/Loss, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Phobias, P
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Immigrants/Refugees, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Barbara Cavanaugh
Barbara Tolle Cavanaugh, LCSW
(713) 523-2772
2246 Bissonnet Street
Houston, TX
Credentials
Credentials: ACSW, LCSW
Licensed in Texas
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Twins, Step Families, Chronic Illness
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Aaron Pawelek
Pastoral Counseling and Education Center
(214) 526-4525
4525 Lemmon Avenue Suite 200
Dallas, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
6 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Spiritual/Religious Concerns, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Jill Steward
Jill Steward, LCSW
(512) 231-9033
4131 Spicewood Springs Road Building M, Suite 1
Austin, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
16 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, O
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Caregivers, Step Families, Gifted
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Jamie Loveland
Teen and Family Services
(713) 464-3950
11140 Greenbay
Houston, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
7 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Behavioral Problems, Couple or Marital Issues, Family Dysfunction, Parenting Issues, Trauma/PTSD, Dual Diagnosis
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Kathy Rider
Kathy T. Rider, LCSW, BCD, CGP, FAGPA
(512) 452-8948
3724 Jefferson Ste 206
Austin, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, BCD, CGP
Licensed in Texas
42 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disord
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Step Families, Gifted, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Julia Penn
Julia M Penn LCSW- Individual and Couple Counseling
(512) 454-0992
3113 Grandview Street Ste 100
Austin, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural
Populations Served
AIDS/HIV+, Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Transgendered, Military/Veterans, Immigrants/Refugees, Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Gifted, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial, Obese or Overweight
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Connie Wildey
Constance E. Wildey, LCSW
(281) 534-3113
5501 Sycamore Drive
Dickinson, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Autism/PDD, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Physical Illness/Impairment, Sexual Abus
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Roberta Ketchum
Westheimer Psychotherapy Center
(713) 780-4644
2425 Fountain View Dr SUITE 275
Houston, TX
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Texas
38 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Psychoses/Major Mental Illness, Sex
Populations Served
AIDS/HIV+, Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Making your Marriage Work

The Best Gift for Your Child: Romance for Your Wife

~The Best Gift for Your Child: Romance for Your Wife^

Written by Michael Webb

You love your children; you deeply desire to see them grow up healthy and happy. But what is the most important thing you can give your children to help them grow up feeling loved, nurtured, self-confident and at peace?

There are many good answers here, such as providing a comfortable home in a safe neighborhood; making great sacrifices to help your children succeed in school; demonstrating unconditional love; setting consistent boundaries; modeling healthy values; and on and on.

ImageOne other important factor too often gets left off that list, and I'd place it right at the top. It's loving your wife.

You're two of the most important people in the world to your children, probably the most important. How do you think your child feels when one parent yells at, belittles, taunts, or insults the other? I imagine they feel like I did when it was obvious my parents didn't love each other. I was torn, hurt, angry, scared, and uncertain about my future.

It is especially traumatic for children to see their mother-with whom that child has always had a special attachment—being hurt or neglected by their father. Too many dads con themselves into believing that the best way to invest in their children's future is to work long hours so they can live in a nicer neighborhood and send their children to better schools. In the process, they often end up jeopardizing the element that actually has the most impact on their children's lives—the relationship between Mom and Dad. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~A Dad's Secret Weapon: Parental Discussion^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Do you think of your wife as a teammate? This is not like when she feeds the kids, changes their diapers, dresses them and then gives them to you to play with. That's hardly teamwork.

This kind of teamwork isn't even like a machine—like an eleven-man offense marching a football ninety yards to score. It isn't having a secret weapon come in for a fourth-and-long desperation play.

No, this teamwork is more like what happens at halftime in the locker room. Coaches review the stats, talk about what the players are and aren't doing well, and give encouragement for the second half.

ImageIn fathering, we call it parental discussion, and more and more of us are reaping its benefits. It's where you compare notes with your wife, ask for feedback on how you're doing, and gather the strength to love your kids through whatever struggles may arise tomorrow. Part strategy, part pep talk.

The benefits are threefold:

First, your wife can provide you with information about your children. She is with them in situations you're not. When the kids are finally settled quietly in bed, her stories about the events of the day—and how your children reacted—will tell you much about who your kids are. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Recommit to Your Marriage Vows^

Written by Carey Casey

Date Posted: Tuesday, 20 May 2008

Men, are you taking your wife for granted? Let me take care of that nonsense right now. I have buddies whose brides died of cancer. A while back I received a call from my friend Billy about his wife, whom he has loved since they met back in college. He said, “Carey, she’s sick. She’s really in trouble.” And he broke down and cried.

ImageMen who have lost their wives would give anything to go back and do things just a little better. Maybe they’d change their priorities, or make better use of the time they do have. Men who have been through a divorce often have similar feelings.

Sometimes you hear about couples renewing their marriage vows, and I think that’s a useful idea whether it’s a formal ceremony or just an inner recommitment “from this day forward, ‘til death do us part.”

And what about that line, “in sickness and in health”? I don’t think the bride and groom fully appreciate what they’re saying. What if the marriage ceremony actually listed some of the possible challenges, sicknesses and tragedies? What if one of the spouses will get cancer, be paralyzed, or have mental problems? Maybe they’ll have a miscarriage or two. Tragedy almost always takes us by surprise. And suddenly we’ve forgotten the vows made many years ago, or we never realized what the vows mean in the first place.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~What Children Gain When You Love Their Mother^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

"Who has helped you the most in your fathering?" We asked that very question to thousands of men as part of our research. Some answered, "My father" or "My pastor." Several mentioned Dr. James Dobson. But the most popular answer by far was, "My wife." And when we asked, "Who helps you overcome struggles in your fathering?" the number one answer was, again, "My wife."

ImageYou may be comforted to know you're not alone as a parent, but you should also be challenged, because your power as a father is greatly affected by your relationship with your children's mother. Are you striving together with her as you progress toward a common goal, or are you struggling against her, and spinning in circles?

She's your number one asset and ally as a father, and showing her love and respect is one of the best things any father can do for his kids.

Two Indispensable Perspectives

Even if you were some kind of Superman, you could still only supply your children with a masculine perspective of the world, valuable as it is. It takes a woman—ideally their mother—to provide the deep feminine input that rounds out their world and opens up more of the wonders of adulthood.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~What will your child's marriage look like?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 31 August 2007

The current generation of fathers has been decimated by the tragedy of divorce. Many men saw their parents divorce, and some have been through a divorce themselves. These men have often told us that they wish they had seen a good marriage in action when they were young. They had a deep desire to see a committed, loving relationship between the two people they loved the most, and they are still missing that model now that they have children of their own.

Our CEO, Carey Casey, is grateful that he had positive role models in his mom and pop. This past Valentine’s Day, he shared some priceless memories of them that exemplified a close, intimate bond in marriage. Listen as he tells those stories:

Open in popup window   |  Listen now:  

ImageHave you ever thought about how your marriage looks to your children—or about how your attitudes toward marriage are influencing them? Whether you’re seeking to be a cycle-breaker in your family, or you want to faithfully capitalize on the example your father set for you, it’s important to purposefully set a positive example. If you fail to do this, the likelihood that your children will face divorce increases significantly. Your modeling influences your children's perspectives and practices in their own marriages.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Great Dates (even for busy parents)^

Written by David & Claudia Arp

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

Remember your dating days—those long walks, romantic dinners, and intimate conversations that were the milestones of falling in love? Those moments full of emotion and closeness became the foundation for your marriage relationship.

ImageHowever, for most, dating abruptly ends after the marriage vows—and if not then, just wait until the kids come along. Between diapers, late-night feedings, and then later, getting them to soccer or ballet and helping with English papers and science projects, few parents have enough energy and desire to romance or date their mate.

We had been married for almost four years when three simple words, “It’s a boy!” changed our lives forever. Our dating was history. It was like someone rolled a hand grenade under our bed. As new parents, we were overwhelmed, exhausted and insecure. We kept waiting for life to return to normal, but it never did. After two more kids, life began to spin out of control. Our ultimate romantic fantasy was eight hours of uninterrupted sleep.

As we soon learned, it doesn’t have to be that way—not if you budget time for some Great Dates. You can recapture the passion that got you your job as parents in the first place. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~The Most Special Person in Your Life^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

In an effort to find out what really makes women feel appreciated, wanted, and loved, authors Lucy Sanna and Kathy Miller surveyed women from ages 20 to 70, using over 100 questions. The responses they received were not generally surprising, but they can serve as reminders to us husbands and fathers.

ImageWhen asked, "What is romance?" the women's responses included:

  • "He treats me as the most special person in his life."
  • "He is available when I need help."
  • "He touches me with tenderness."
  • "He shares his thoughts and dreams with me."
  • "He listens to me intently."
  • "He keeps in touch when we are apart."
  • "He knows what makes me happy."
  • "He surprises me with small tokens of love."
  • "He tells me he loves me."

So often, it's the everyday actions and thoughtful gestures that are demonstrations of how we feel.

For some dads, the planning and gift-buying leading up to Valentine's Day, a birthday or Christmas is a joy. For single dads or others who don't have a "valentine," this time of year can be tough to get through. For others, the "romance thing" doesn't come naturally, and they miss out on the opportunity to build a stronger relationship. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~A Wagon Ride with Dad^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

I'm a better father because of my wife, Dee. And, you can be a better father because of your wife.

Many years back, when Dee and I were living in Vancouver, British Columbia, we were walking along the hills by the shore with our two daughters, Hannah and Sarah. Dee was pregnant with Joel, our third child, and I was pulling the two little girls along in their red wagon. The air was fresh. I remember bouncing up on my toes and swinging my free arm out to my side.

ImageAs we came to the crest of a long hill, I was overtaken with exuberance. I hopped into the wagon behind Hannah and Sarah, grabbed the black steel handle, and with several powerful kicks sent us careening down the sidewalk. What adventure! I was whooping and laughing, the girls were cheering me on, and we must have reached speeds up to 20 mph before the terrain leveled out and we coasted to a halt.

When my pregnant wife ambled down to where we were waiting, I knew something was wrong. Dee recounted our wild wagon ride back to me and pointed out that I had really put the girls in a situation which was potentially very dangerous. She told me how she felt, but God bless her, she did it in love and we talked it through calmly. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

A Dad's Secret Weapon: Parental Discussion

~The Best Gift for Your Child: Romance for Your Wife^

Written by Michael Webb

You love your children; you deeply desire to see them grow up healthy and happy. But what is the most important thing you can give your children to help them grow up feeling loved, nurtured, self-confident and at peace?

There are many good answers here, such as providing a comfortable home in a safe neighborhood; making great sacrifices to help your children succeed in school; demonstrating unconditional love; setting consistent boundaries; modeling healthy values; and on and on.

ImageOne other important factor too often gets left off that list, and I'd place it right at the top. It's loving your wife.

You're two of the most important people in the world to your children, probably the most important. How do you think your child feels when one parent yells at, belittles, taunts, or insults the other? I imagine they feel like I did when it was obvious my parents didn't love each other. I was torn, hurt, angry, scared, and uncertain about my future.

It is especially traumatic for children to see their mother-with whom that child has always had a special attachment—being hurt or neglected by their father. Too many dads con themselves into believing that the best way to invest in their children's future is to work long hours so they can live in a nicer neighborhood and send their children to better schools. In the process, they often end up jeopardizing the element that actually has the most impact on their children's lives—the relationship between Mom and Dad. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~A Dad's Secret Weapon: Parental Discussion^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Do you think of your wife as a teammate? This is not like when she feeds the kids, changes their diapers, dresses them and then gives them to you to play with. That's hardly teamwork.

This kind of teamwork isn't even like a machine—like an eleven-man offense marching a football ninety yards to score. It isn't having a secret weapon come in for a fourth-and-long desperation play.

No, this teamwork is more like what happens at halftime in the locker room. Coaches review the stats, talk about what the players are and aren't doing well, and give encouragement for the second half.

ImageIn fathering, we call it parental discussion, and more and more of us are reaping its benefits. It's where you compare notes with your wife, ask for feedback on how you're doing, and gather the strength to love your kids through whatever struggles may arise tomorrow. Part strategy, part pep talk.

The benefits are threefold:

First, your wife can provide you with information about your children. She is with them in situations you're not. When the kids are finally settled quietly in bed, her stories about the events of the day—and how your children reacted—will tell you much about who your kids are. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Recommit to Your Marriage Vows^

Written by Carey Casey

Date Posted: Tuesday, 20 May 2008

Men, are you taking your wife for granted? Let me take care of that nonsense right now. I have buddies whose brides died of cancer. A while back I received a call from my friend Billy about his wife, whom he has loved since they met back in college. He said, “Carey, she’s sick. She’s really in trouble.” And he broke down and cried.

ImageMen who have lost their wives would give anything to go back and do things just a little better. Maybe they’d change their priorities, or make better use of the time they do have. Men who have been through a divorce often have similar feelings.

Sometimes you hear about couples renewing their marriage vows, and I think that’s a useful idea whether it’s a formal ceremony or just an inner recommitment “from this day forward, ‘til death do us part.”

And what about that line, “in sickness and in health”? I don’t think the bride and groom fully appreciate what they’re saying. What if the marriage ceremony actually listed some of the possible challenges, sicknesses and tragedies? What if one of the spouses will get cancer, be paralyzed, or have mental problems? Maybe they’ll have a miscarriage or two. Tragedy almost always takes us by surprise. And suddenly we’ve forgotten the vows made many years ago, or we never realized what the vows mean in the first place.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~What Children Gain When You Love Their Mother^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

"Who has helped you the most in your fathering?" We asked that very question to thousands of men as part of our research. Some answered, "My father" or "My pastor." Several mentioned Dr. James Dobson. But the most popular answer by far was, "My wife." And when we asked, "Who helps you overcome struggles in your fathering?" the number one answer was, again, "My wife."

ImageYou may be comforted to know you're not alone as a parent, but you should also be challenged, because your power as a father is greatly affected by your relationship with your children's mother. Are you striving together with her as you progress toward a common goal, or are you struggling against her, and spinning in circles?

She's your number one asset and ally as a father, and showing her love and respect is one of the best things any father can do for his kids.

Two Indispensable Perspectives

Even if you were some kind of Superman, you could still only supply your children with a masculine perspective of the world, valuable as it is. It takes a woman—ideally their mother—to provide the deep feminine input that rounds out their world and opens up more of the wonders of adulthood.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~What will your child's marriage look like?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 31 August 2007

The current generation of fathers has been decimated by the tragedy of divorce. Many men saw their parents divorce, and some have been through a divorce themselves. These men have often told us that they wish they had seen a good marriage in action when they were young. They had a deep desire to see a committed, loving relationship between the two people they loved the most, and they are still missing that model now that they have children of their own.

Our CEO, Carey Casey, is grateful that he had positive role models in his mom and pop. This past Valentine’s Day, he shared some priceless memories of them that exemplified a close, intimate bond in marriage. Listen as he tells those stories:

Open in popup window   |  Listen now:  

ImageHave you ever thought about how your marriage looks to your children—or about how your attitudes toward marriage are influencing them? Whether you’re seeking to be a cycle-breaker in your family, or you want to faithfully capitalize on the example your father set for you, it’s important to purposefully set a positive example. If you fail to do this, the likelihood that your children will face divorce increases significantly. Your modeling influences your children's perspectives and practices in their own marriages.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Great Dates (even for busy parents)^

Written by David & Claudia Arp

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

Remember your dating days—those long walks, romantic dinners, and intimate conversations that were the milestones of falling in love? Those moments full of emotion and closeness became the foundation for your marriage relationship.

ImageHowever, for most, dating abruptly ends after the marriage vows—and if not then, just wait until the kids come along. Between diapers, late-night feedings, and then later, getting them to soccer or ballet and helping with English papers and science projects, few parents have enough energy and desire to romance or date their mate.

We had been married for almost four years when three simple words, “It’s a boy!” changed our lives forever. Our dating was history. It was like someone rolled a hand grenade under our bed. As new parents, we were overwhelmed, exhausted and insecure. We kept waiting for life to return to normal, but it never did. After two more kids, life began to spin out of control. Our ultimate romantic fantasy was eight hours of uninterrupted sleep.

As we soon learned, it doesn’t have to be that way—not if you budget time for some Great Dates. You can recapture the passion that got you your job as parents in the first place. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~The Most Special Person in Your Life^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

In an effort to find out what really makes women feel appreciated, wanted, and loved, authors Lucy Sanna and Kathy Miller surveyed women from ages 20 to 70, using over 100 questions. The responses they received were not generally surprising, but they can serve as reminders to us husbands and fathers.

ImageWhen asked, "What is romance?" the women's responses included:

  • "He treats me as the most special person in his life."
  • "He is available when I need help."
  • "He touches me with tenderness."
  • "He shares his thoughts and dreams with me."
  • "He listens to me intently."
  • "He keeps in touch when we are apart."
  • "He knows what makes me happy."
  • "He surprises me with small tokens of love."
  • "He tells me he loves me."

So often, it's the everyday actions and thoughtful gestures that are demonstrations of how we feel.

For some dads, the planning and gift-buying leading up to Valentine's Day, a birthday or Christmas is a joy. For single dads or others who don't have a "valentine," this time of year can be tough to get through. For others, the "romance thing" doesn't come naturally, and they miss out on the opportunity to build a stronger relationship. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~A Wagon Ride with Dad^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

I'm a better father because of my wife, Dee. And, you can be a better father because of your wife.

Many years back, when Dee and I were living in Vancouver, British Columbia, we were walking along the hills by the shore with our two daughters, Hannah and Sarah. Dee was pregnant with Joel, our third child, and I was pulling the two little girls along in their red wagon. The air was fresh. I remember bouncing up on my toes and swinging my free arm out to my side.

ImageAs we came to the crest of a long hill, I was overtaken with exuberance. I hopped into the wagon behind Hannah and Sarah, grabbed the black steel handle, and with several powerful kicks sent us careening down the sidewalk. What adventure! I was whooping and laughing, the girls were cheering me on, and we must have reached speeds up to 20 mph before the terrain leveled out and we coasted to a halt.

When my pregnant wife ambled down to where we were waiting, I knew something was wrong. Dee recounted our wild wagon ride back to me and pointed out that I had really put the girls in a situation which was potentially very dangerous. She told me how she felt, but God bless her, she did it in love and we talked it through calmly. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Recommit to Your Marriage Vows

~The Best Gift for Your Child: Romance for Your Wife^

Written by Michael Webb

You love your children; you deeply desire to see them grow up healthy and happy. But what is the most important thing you can give your children to help them grow up feeling loved, nurtured, self-confident and at peace?

There are many good answers here, such as providing a comfortable home in a safe neighborhood; making great sacrifices to help your children succeed in school; demonstrating unconditional love; setting consistent boundaries; modeling healthy values; and on and on.

ImageOne other important factor too often gets left off that list, and I'd place it right at the top. It's loving your wife.

You're two of the most important people in the world to your children, probably the most important. How do you think your child feels when one parent yells at, belittles, taunts, or insults the other? I imagine they feel like I did when it was obvious my parents didn't love each other. I was torn, hurt, angry, scared, and uncertain about my future.

It is especially traumatic for children to see their mother-with whom that child has always had a special attachment—being hurt or neglected by their father. Too many dads con themselves into believing that the best way to invest in their children's future is to work long hours so they can live in a nicer neighborhood and send their children to better schools. In the process, they often end up jeopardizing the element that actually has the most impact on their children's lives—the relationship between Mom and Dad. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~A Dad's Secret Weapon: Parental Discussion^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Do you think of your wife as a teammate? This is not like when she feeds the kids, changes their diapers, dresses them and then gives them to you to play with. That's hardly teamwork.

This kind of teamwork isn't even like a machine—like an eleven-man offense marching a football ninety yards to score. It isn't having a secret weapon come in for a fourth-and-long desperation play.

No, this teamwork is more like what happens at halftime in the locker room. Coaches review the stats, talk about what the players are and aren't doing well, and give encouragement for the second half.

ImageIn fathering, we call it parental discussion, and more and more of us are reaping its benefits. It's where you compare notes with your wife, ask for feedback on how you're doing, and gather the strength to love your kids through whatever struggles may arise tomorrow. Part strategy, part pep talk.

The benefits are threefold:

First, your wife can provide you with information about your children. She is with them in situations you're not. When the kids are finally settled quietly in bed, her stories about the events of the day—and how your children reacted—will tell you much about who your kids are. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Recommit to Your Marriage Vows^

Written by Carey Casey

Date Posted: Tuesday, 20 May 2008

Men, are you taking your wife for granted? Let me take care of that nonsense right now. I have buddies whose brides died of cancer. A while back I received a call from my friend Billy about his wife, whom he has loved since they met back in college. He said, “Carey, she’s sick. She’s really in trouble.” And he broke down and cried.

ImageMen who have lost their wives would give anything to go back and do things just a little better. Maybe they’d change their priorities, or make better use of the time they do have. Men who have been through a divorce often have similar feelings.

Sometimes you hear about couples renewing their marriage vows, and I think that’s a useful idea whether it’s a formal ceremony or just an inner recommitment “from this day forward, ‘til death do us part.”

And what about that line, “in sickness and in health”? I don’t think the bride and groom fully appreciate what they’re saying. What if the marriage ceremony actually listed some of the possible challenges, sicknesses and tragedies? What if one of the spouses will get cancer, be paralyzed, or have mental problems? Maybe they’ll have a miscarriage or two. Tragedy almost always takes us by surprise. And suddenly we’ve forgotten the vows made many years ago, or we never realized what the vows mean in the first place.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~What Children Gain When You Love Their Mother^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

"Who has helped you the most in your fathering?" We asked that very question to thousands of men as part of our research. Some answered, "My father" or "My pastor." Several mentioned Dr. James Dobson. But the most popular answer by far was, "My wife." And when we asked, "Who helps you overcome struggles in your fathering?" the number one answer was, again, "My wife."

ImageYou may be comforted to know you're not alone as a parent, but you should also be challenged, because your power as a father is greatly affected by your relationship with your children's mother. Are you striving together with her as you progress toward a common goal, or are you struggling against her, and spinning in circles?

She's your number one asset and ally as a father, and showing her love and respect is one of the best things any father can do for his kids.

Two Indispensable Perspectives

Even if you were some kind of Superman, you could still only supply your children with a masculine perspective of the world, valuable as it is. It takes a woman—ideally their mother—to provide the deep feminine input that rounds out their world and opens up more of the wonders of adulthood.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~What will your child's marriage look like?^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 31 August 2007

The current generation of fathers has been decimated by the tragedy of divorce. Many men saw their parents divorce, and some have been through a divorce themselves. These men have often told us that they wish they had seen a good marriage in action when they were young. They had a deep desire to see a committed, loving relationship between the two people they loved the most, and they are still missing that model now that they have children of their own.

Our CEO, Carey Casey, is grateful that he had positive role models in his mom and pop. This past Valentine’s Day, he shared some priceless memories of them that exemplified a close, intimate bond in marriage. Listen as he tells those stories:

Open in popup window   |  Listen now:  

ImageHave you ever thought about how your marriage looks to your children—or about how your attitudes toward marriage are influencing them? Whether you’re seeking to be a cycle-breaker in your family, or you want to faithfully capitalize on the example your father set for you, it’s important to purposefully set a positive example. If you fail to do this, the likelihood that your children will face divorce increases significantly. Your modeling influences your children's perspectives and practices in their own marriages.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Great Dates (even for busy parents)^

Written by David & Claudia Arp

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

Remember your dating days—those long walks, romantic dinners, and intimate conversations that were the milestones of falling in love? Those moments full of emotion and closeness became the foundation for your marriage relationship.

ImageHowever, for most, dating abruptly ends after the marriage vows—and if not then, just wait until the kids come along. Between diapers, late-night feedings, and then later, getting them to soccer or ballet and helping with English papers and science projects, few parents have enough energy and desire to romance or date their mate.

We had been married for almost four years when three simple words, “It’s a boy!” changed our lives forever. Our dating was history. It was like someone rolled a hand grenade under our bed. As new parents, we were overwhelmed, exhausted and insecure. We kept waiting for life to return to normal, but it never did. After two more kids, life began to spin out of control. Our ultimate romantic fantasy was eight hours of uninterrupted sleep.

As we soon learned, it doesn’t have to be that way—not if you budget time for some Great Dates. You can recapture the passion that got you your job as parents in the first place. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~The Most Special Person in Your Life^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

In an effort to find out what really makes women feel appreciated, wanted, and loved, authors Lucy Sanna and Kathy Miller surveyed women from ages 20 to 70, using over 100 questions. The responses they received were not generally surprising, but they can serve as reminders to us husbands and fathers.

ImageWhen asked, "What is romance?" the women's responses included:

  • "He treats me as the most special person in his life."
  • "He is available when I need help."
  • "He touches me with tenderness."
  • "He shares his thoughts and dreams with me."
  • "He listens to me intently."
  • "He keeps in touch when we are apart."
  • "He knows what makes me happy."
  • "He surprises me with small tokens of love."
  • "He tells me he loves me."

So often, it's the everyday actions and thoughtful gestures that are demonstrations of how we feel.

For some dads, the planning and gift-buying leading up to Valentine's Day, a birthday or Christmas is a joy. For single dads or others who don't have a "valentine," this time of year can be tough to get through. For others, the "romance thing" doesn't come naturally, and they miss out on the opportunity to build a stronger relationship. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~A Wagon Ride with Dad^

Written by Ken Canfield

Date Posted: Monday, 30 April 2007

I'm a better father because of my wife, Dee. And, you can be a better father because of your wife.

Many years back, when Dee and I were living in Vancouver, British Columbia, we were walking along the hills by the shore with our two daughters, Hannah and Sarah. Dee was pregnant with Joel, our third child, and I was pulling the two little girls along in their red wagon. The air was fresh. I remember bouncing up on my toes and swinging my free arm out to my side.

ImageAs we came to the crest of a long hill, I was overtaken with exuberance. I hopped into the wagon behind Hannah and Sarah, grabbed the black steel handle, and with several powerful kicks sent us careening down the sidewalk. What adventure! I was whooping and laughing, the girls were cheering me on, and we must have reached speeds up to 20 mph before the terrain leveled out and we coasted to a halt.

When my pregnant wife ambled down to where we were waiting, I knew something was wrong. Dee recounted our wild wagon ride back to me and pointed out that I had really put the girls in a situation which was potentially very dangerous. She told me how she felt, but God bless her, she did it in love and we talked it through calmly. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com