Divorce Therapist Oak Harbor WA

Divorce is difficult for everyone involved, including the children who often get caught in the middle. Get some information on how to handle divorce so that your children adjust well to the new situation and don't get hurt in the process. Please scroll down for more information and access to all the available resources and services in Oak Harbor, WA listed below including divorce lawyers.

Charles Niedzialkowski
(360) 257-8063
Oak Harbor, WA
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Clinical Mental Health, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
German

Darleen Crowell Kildow
(360) 629-4709
Stanwood, WA
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Supervision
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Amy Bellis
(360) 419-3608
Mount Vernon, WA
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Supervision
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Ms. Alison Hadley
Professional Counseling Group
(509) 456-8199
323 West 15th Avenue
Spokane, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW, DCSW
Licensed in Washington
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Michael Mele
Clearpath Counseling & Creative Wellness Studio
(360) 376-7160
138 North Beach Rd. P.O. Box 578
Eastsound, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW, CST
Licensed in Washington
15 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Diso
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), AIDS/HIV+, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mr. David P Eekhoff
(360) 389-2993
Presbyterian Counseling Center of Port Townsend1140 Jefferson Street
Port Townsend, WA
Specialties
Divorce, Depression, Spirituality, Elderly Persons Disorders
Qualification
School: California State University, Fresno
Year of Graduation: 1985
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Male
Age: Adults,Elders
Average Cost
$30 - $100
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: APS Healthcare

Betsy Lozar
(360) 610-4015
Mount Vernon, WA
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Ms. Carole Danis
Carole Milan Danis, MSW, LICSW
(206) 633-0101
13535 Linden Ave N
Seattle, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Washington
35 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Spiritual/Religious Concerns, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Debra Rood
Stepping Stones Counseling
(509) 301-7252
409 E Sumach St.
Walla Walla, WA
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LICSW
Licensed in Washington
5 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Psychoses/Major Mental Illness, Runaways, Str
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Christine Pollastro
Wellspring Counseling Service
(360) 695-1022
2031 Broadway, Suite C
Vancouver, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW, ACSW
Licensed in Washington
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Parenting Issues, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Tra
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Divorce

Divorced Dads: Have a Conscious Commitment

~Divorced Dads: Have a Conscious Commitment^

Written by Serge Prengel

Regardless of how little time you actually get to spend with your child, you're still his father. You may not be a father in the way you want to be, but yours is as real a father-child relationship as any. This is the one and only way that you can have a relationship with this child at this point.

If you try to live up to the image of the all-giving, ever-present father, you are bound to disappoint your child, as well as yourself. You’ll end up being defined by your shortcomings.

It’s easy to spend a lot of time dealing not with the reality of your situation, but with your ideas of how it should be. Life becomes simpler when you accept that reality as a starting point for your actions, as opposed to what should be.

ImageYou no longer take the relationship for granted. You cannot take it for granted that you’ll have unlimited amounts of time—that there will always be time for saying or doing the important things. Now, you have to figure out what’s really important and consciously make sure that it happens.

You are more conscious of the value of this bond, for you have reaffirmed the strength of your commitment in a conscious way and geared your life to this end—the same way as somebody who has been close to death values life even more for knowing how precious it is. ...

~Divorced Dads and the Holidays^

Written by Waylon Ward

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

It was one of those cards written to make you grin at the sarcasm and I did chuckle. The card, decorated appropriately with red berries and green holly, read: "Don't let them destroy the hypocrisy of Christmas... It's the only part I enjoy!"

Even though such cartoons make us grin, they also remind us that the holidays can be tough for some people.

Divorced dads particularly find the holidays often lonely and very sad. I remember a Thanksgiving meal at a local Holiday Inn during my divorce. The food wasn't too bad, but the loneliness tasted horrible. And there was a Christmas Eve night spent at another Holiday Inn just a few short blocks from where my kids were asleep in the house where I used to live with their mother.

ImageThe holidays, particularly Thanksgiving and Christmas, are tough on divorced dads and their kids, and the first couple of years are often the roughest. This has to do with the "family nature" of these special days, the holiday traditions, and memories of past years as an intact family.

Visitation usually means that parents alternate years and holidays, so it means every other Thanksgiving and every other Christmas is going to be spent away from your children. It's hard, but not impossible. Here are a few ideas to make the season a more enjoyable experience for you and your children: ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Simple Truths for Dads Facing Barriers^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 02 October 2009

Although divorced dads may identify with this most easily, every dad faces relationship barriers of some kind, and all dads can benefit from being reminded about a few simple truths.

Not long ago, we heard from a divorced dad whom we'll call Mike. He's been through some very difficult trials and has made some mistakes that really became roadblocks for a relationship with his daughter. But recently Mike's daughter made contact with him indicating she wants to be part of his life. The problem is, Mike feels paralyzed. He can't forgive himself for the sins of his past.

 All dads face challenges, whether they are divorced, married, single, new dads, stepfathers, dads of teenagers, dads in prison, dads who travel a lot for work, and so on. Some dads are fighting just to see their children. Others might not see their kids for months at a time because of some unavoidable arrangement of work responsibilities, where the mother lives, or other factors. And some do see their children, but may feel paralyzed because of fractured relationships, unhealthy patterns they have established through the years, feelings of inadequacy, or big mistakes their children have made, and they don't know how to make things better. Some dads, like Mike, can't seem to shake their own painful memories and mistakes. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Co-Parenting For Our Kids^

Written by RJ Jaramillo

As I look back on my own personal experiences with co-parenting, I can only draw one conclusion: I could have saved a lot of time and avoided a lot of stress if had I worried more about my behavior than my ex's.  To save other guys the same painful and unnecessary process, here are the challenges that I faced when I became a single dad and had to learn to co-parent with my ex and the hard lessons I learned.

What Happened?

We can all relate to those words. Somehow our relationship has ended and we are single parents. The legal system decides the portion of custody we have of our kids. It’s typically given in percentages, (70/30, 60/40, 50/50). I am still confused about how this is calculated. And yes, it hurts to know that the courts favor mothers over fathers. But that is the rule of the game guys, and I had to get used to it! Initially, I had only 30% custody, but I held my head high and never gave up on wanting that percentage to change.

ImageCo-Parenting; Why Is It So Difficult?

My divorce was much like everyone else’s. We spent a lot of time on emotional battles and a lot of money on attorney bills. I continued to harbor bad feelings about my ex-wife and the legal process.  I couldn’t see that I was carrying around a bitter grudge that showed up any time there was communication between the two of us.  ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Divorced Dads: Research & Redemption^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

We know from a considerable amount of research that divorce impacts a family for generations. Children especially tend to carry negative feelings about home, marriage and sexuality into their adult lives, and they are more anxious and pessimistic about their future.

We could list studies showing that fathers who grew up in broken homes struggle in significant areas such as problem solving and being aware of their children’s abilities. One of the saddest findings, by researcher Ross Parke, notes that two years after a divorce, the majority of fathers have little or no contact with their children.

ImageA father named Dan never wanted to divorce, but his wife was determined to go through with it.  Dan tried to make the best of it—he committed himself to fight against the distressing odds associated with dads and divorce. He did whatever it took to be an important part of his daughter’s life. At one point, he was driving 400 miles each weekend to see her.  Despite difficulties in custody and visitation arrangements, Dan never missed a child support check. After 15 years, his investment has paid off, and it shows in the strong, ever-deepening relationship with his daughter.  ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Divorced Dads and the Holidays

~Divorced Dads: Have a Conscious Commitment^

Written by Serge Prengel

Regardless of how little time you actually get to spend with your child, you're still his father. You may not be a father in the way you want to be, but yours is as real a father-child relationship as any. This is the one and only way that you can have a relationship with this child at this point.

If you try to live up to the image of the all-giving, ever-present father, you are bound to disappoint your child, as well as yourself. You’ll end up being defined by your shortcomings.

It’s easy to spend a lot of time dealing not with the reality of your situation, but with your ideas of how it should be. Life becomes simpler when you accept that reality as a starting point for your actions, as opposed to what should be.

ImageYou no longer take the relationship for granted. You cannot take it for granted that you’ll have unlimited amounts of time—that there will always be time for saying or doing the important things. Now, you have to figure out what’s really important and consciously make sure that it happens.

You are more conscious of the value of this bond, for you have reaffirmed the strength of your commitment in a conscious way and geared your life to this end—the same way as somebody who has been close to death values life even more for knowing how precious it is. ...

~Divorced Dads and the Holidays^

Written by Waylon Ward

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

It was one of those cards written to make you grin at the sarcasm and I did chuckle. The card, decorated appropriately with red berries and green holly, read: "Don't let them destroy the hypocrisy of Christmas... It's the only part I enjoy!"

Even though such cartoons make us grin, they also remind us that the holidays can be tough for some people.

Divorced dads particularly find the holidays often lonely and very sad. I remember a Thanksgiving meal at a local Holiday Inn during my divorce. The food wasn't too bad, but the loneliness tasted horrible. And there was a Christmas Eve night spent at another Holiday Inn just a few short blocks from where my kids were asleep in the house where I used to live with their mother.

ImageThe holidays, particularly Thanksgiving and Christmas, are tough on divorced dads and their kids, and the first couple of years are often the roughest. This has to do with the "family nature" of these special days, the holiday traditions, and memories of past years as an intact family.

Visitation usually means that parents alternate years and holidays, so it means every other Thanksgiving and every other Christmas is going to be spent away from your children. It's hard, but not impossible. Here are a few ideas to make the season a more enjoyable experience for you and your children: ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Simple Truths for Dads Facing Barriers^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 02 October 2009

Although divorced dads may identify with this most easily, every dad faces relationship barriers of some kind, and all dads can benefit from being reminded about a few simple truths.

Not long ago, we heard from a divorced dad whom we'll call Mike. He's been through some very difficult trials and has made some mistakes that really became roadblocks for a relationship with his daughter. But recently Mike's daughter made contact with him indicating she wants to be part of his life. The problem is, Mike feels paralyzed. He can't forgive himself for the sins of his past.

 All dads face challenges, whether they are divorced, married, single, new dads, stepfathers, dads of teenagers, dads in prison, dads who travel a lot for work, and so on. Some dads are fighting just to see their children. Others might not see their kids for months at a time because of some unavoidable arrangement of work responsibilities, where the mother lives, or other factors. And some do see their children, but may feel paralyzed because of fractured relationships, unhealthy patterns they have established through the years, feelings of inadequacy, or big mistakes their children have made, and they don't know how to make things better. Some dads, like Mike, can't seem to shake their own painful memories and mistakes. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Co-Parenting For Our Kids^

Written by RJ Jaramillo

As I look back on my own personal experiences with co-parenting, I can only draw one conclusion: I could have saved a lot of time and avoided a lot of stress if had I worried more about my behavior than my ex's.  To save other guys the same painful and unnecessary process, here are the challenges that I faced when I became a single dad and had to learn to co-parent with my ex and the hard lessons I learned.

What Happened?

We can all relate to those words. Somehow our relationship has ended and we are single parents. The legal system decides the portion of custody we have of our kids. It’s typically given in percentages, (70/30, 60/40, 50/50). I am still confused about how this is calculated. And yes, it hurts to know that the courts favor mothers over fathers. But that is the rule of the game guys, and I had to get used to it! Initially, I had only 30% custody, but I held my head high and never gave up on wanting that percentage to change.

ImageCo-Parenting; Why Is It So Difficult?

My divorce was much like everyone else’s. We spent a lot of time on emotional battles and a lot of money on attorney bills. I continued to harbor bad feelings about my ex-wife and the legal process.  I couldn’t see that I was carrying around a bitter grudge that showed up any time there was communication between the two of us.  ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Divorced Dads: Research & Redemption^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

We know from a considerable amount of research that divorce impacts a family for generations. Children especially tend to carry negative feelings about home, marriage and sexuality into their adult lives, and they are more anxious and pessimistic about their future.

We could list studies showing that fathers who grew up in broken homes struggle in significant areas such as problem solving and being aware of their children’s abilities. One of the saddest findings, by researcher Ross Parke, notes that two years after a divorce, the majority of fathers have little or no contact with their children.

ImageA father named Dan never wanted to divorce, but his wife was determined to go through with it.  Dan tried to make the best of it—he committed himself to fight against the distressing odds associated with dads and divorce. He did whatever it took to be an important part of his daughter’s life. At one point, he was driving 400 miles each weekend to see her.  Despite difficulties in custody and visitation arrangements, Dan never missed a child support check. After 15 years, his investment has paid off, and it shows in the strong, ever-deepening relationship with his daughter.  ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Simple Truths for Dads Facing Barriers

~Divorced Dads: Have a Conscious Commitment^

Written by Serge Prengel

Regardless of how little time you actually get to spend with your child, you're still his father. You may not be a father in the way you want to be, but yours is as real a father-child relationship as any. This is the one and only way that you can have a relationship with this child at this point.

If you try to live up to the image of the all-giving, ever-present father, you are bound to disappoint your child, as well as yourself. You’ll end up being defined by your shortcomings.

It’s easy to spend a lot of time dealing not with the reality of your situation, but with your ideas of how it should be. Life becomes simpler when you accept that reality as a starting point for your actions, as opposed to what should be.

ImageYou no longer take the relationship for granted. You cannot take it for granted that you’ll have unlimited amounts of time—that there will always be time for saying or doing the important things. Now, you have to figure out what’s really important and consciously make sure that it happens.

You are more conscious of the value of this bond, for you have reaffirmed the strength of your commitment in a conscious way and geared your life to this end—the same way as somebody who has been close to death values life even more for knowing how precious it is. ...

~Divorced Dads and the Holidays^

Written by Waylon Ward

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

It was one of those cards written to make you grin at the sarcasm and I did chuckle. The card, decorated appropriately with red berries and green holly, read: "Don't let them destroy the hypocrisy of Christmas... It's the only part I enjoy!"

Even though such cartoons make us grin, they also remind us that the holidays can be tough for some people.

Divorced dads particularly find the holidays often lonely and very sad. I remember a Thanksgiving meal at a local Holiday Inn during my divorce. The food wasn't too bad, but the loneliness tasted horrible. And there was a Christmas Eve night spent at another Holiday Inn just a few short blocks from where my kids were asleep in the house where I used to live with their mother.

ImageThe holidays, particularly Thanksgiving and Christmas, are tough on divorced dads and their kids, and the first couple of years are often the roughest. This has to do with the "family nature" of these special days, the holiday traditions, and memories of past years as an intact family.

Visitation usually means that parents alternate years and holidays, so it means every other Thanksgiving and every other Christmas is going to be spent away from your children. It's hard, but not impossible. Here are a few ideas to make the season a more enjoyable experience for you and your children: ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Simple Truths for Dads Facing Barriers^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 02 October 2009

Although divorced dads may identify with this most easily, every dad faces relationship barriers of some kind, and all dads can benefit from being reminded about a few simple truths.

Not long ago, we heard from a divorced dad whom we'll call Mike. He's been through some very difficult trials and has made some mistakes that really became roadblocks for a relationship with his daughter. But recently Mike's daughter made contact with him indicating she wants to be part of his life. The problem is, Mike feels paralyzed. He can't forgive himself for the sins of his past.

 All dads face challenges, whether they are divorced, married, single, new dads, stepfathers, dads of teenagers, dads in prison, dads who travel a lot for work, and so on. Some dads are fighting just to see their children. Others might not see their kids for months at a time because of some unavoidable arrangement of work responsibilities, where the mother lives, or other factors. And some do see their children, but may feel paralyzed because of fractured relationships, unhealthy patterns they have established through the years, feelings of inadequacy, or big mistakes their children have made, and they don't know how to make things better. Some dads, like Mike, can't seem to shake their own painful memories and mistakes. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Co-Parenting For Our Kids^

Written by RJ Jaramillo

As I look back on my own personal experiences with co-parenting, I can only draw one conclusion: I could have saved a lot of time and avoided a lot of stress if had I worried more about my behavior than my ex's.  To save other guys the same painful and unnecessary process, here are the challenges that I faced when I became a single dad and had to learn to co-parent with my ex and the hard lessons I learned.

What Happened?

We can all relate to those words. Somehow our relationship has ended and we are single parents. The legal system decides the portion of custody we have of our kids. It’s typically given in percentages, (70/30, 60/40, 50/50). I am still confused about how this is calculated. And yes, it hurts to know that the courts favor mothers over fathers. But that is the rule of the game guys, and I had to get used to it! Initially, I had only 30% custody, but I held my head high and never gave up on wanting that percentage to change.

ImageCo-Parenting; Why Is It So Difficult?

My divorce was much like everyone else’s. We spent a lot of time on emotional battles and a lot of money on attorney bills. I continued to harbor bad feelings about my ex-wife and the legal process.  I couldn’t see that I was carrying around a bitter grudge that showed up any time there was communication between the two of us.  ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Divorced Dads: Research & Redemption^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Saturday, 28 April 2007

We know from a considerable amount of research that divorce impacts a family for generations. Children especially tend to carry negative feelings about home, marriage and sexuality into their adult lives, and they are more anxious and pessimistic about their future.

We could list studies showing that fathers who grew up in broken homes struggle in significant areas such as problem solving and being aware of their children’s abilities. One of the saddest findings, by researcher Ross Parke, notes that two years after a divorce, the majority of fathers have little or no contact with their children.

ImageA father named Dan never wanted to divorce, but his wife was determined to go through with it.  Dan tried to make the best of it—he committed himself to fight against the distressing odds associated with dads and divorce. He did whatever it took to be an important part of his daughter’s life. At one point, he was driving 400 miles each weekend to see her.  Despite difficulties in custody and visitation arrangements, Dan never missed a child support check. After 15 years, his investment has paid off, and it shows in the strong, ever-deepening relationship with his daughter.  ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

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