Grief Counseling Taunton MA

Maybe your dad helped you with your pitching motion when you were twelve, or spent hours working with you on a seventh grade science project. As your child faces similar challenges at a similar age, use your father's example to inspire you.

Ms. Cheryl Litt
Cheryl Litt, LICSW
(508) 586-1600
1350 Belmont Street Suite 107
Brockton, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Physical Illness/Impairment, Sexual Orientation, Stress, Dual Diagnosis, Life Transitions, Sexuality Issues, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Caregivers, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. PATRICIA ROGERS
PATRICIA R. ROGERS, LICSW,PC
(781) 769-6834
ONE WALPOLE ST. SUITE 8
NORWOOD, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
32 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Trauma/PTSD
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Sharon Steinberg
Sharon H. Steinberg, MSW
(508) 676-1186
45 North Main Street Suite 301
Fall River, MA
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Life Transitions
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Waltraut Benjamin
Waltraut Benjamin LICSW, DCSW
(508) 252-4861
105 Medway Street
Providence, RI
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Rhode Island
22 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Obsessive/Compuls
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), AIDS/HIV+, Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Transgendered, Immigrants/Refugees, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mr. James Tooley
Southeastern Counseling Associates
(508) 998-1115
One Welby Road Lower Level
New Bedford, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
32 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Military/Veterans, Caregivers
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Brenda Fraser
(781) 413-6373
450 North Main St.
Sharon, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
11 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Caregivers
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Christine Sweeney
Chrisitne Sweeney, LICSW
(339) 206-1513
55 Harrow Road
Norwood, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
17 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Grief/Loss, Parenting Issues, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Life Transitions, Women's Issues, Infant Mental Health
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Michael Kane
Human Services Consultants
(401) 331-7777
277 Waterman Street
Providence, RI
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Rhode Island
21 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Aging, Child Abuse and Neglect, Depression, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Anger Management, Attachment Disorders
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Military/Veterans, Caregivers, Step Families, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Stephen Muggeo
Stephen S. Muggeo, LICSW
(401) 272-3419
9 South Angell Street
Providence, RI
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Rhode Island
15 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Phobias, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Gender Identity, Life Transitions, Sexuality Issues
Populations Served
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Step Families, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Samantha Martinez
(781) 866-9497
21 Totman Street, Suite 203
Quincy, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW, C-SSWS
Licensed in Massachusetts
5 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Child Abuse and Neglect, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Multicultural Issues, Parenting Issues, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Attachment Disorders
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Grieving Counselors

Your Heritage and Your Legacy

~Your Heritage and Your Legacy^

Written by Ken Canfield

Some of my recent study has gone toward helping fathers understand the hand-in-hand connection between their heritage and their legacy. Becoming a father is often a catalyst for a man to process his past and begin planning for the future—his and his children’s.

ImageWith that in mind, I have come up with an exercise for fathers consisting of two sets of six questions. These will challenge you to ponder the impact of past experiences (your childhood and adult life leading up to when you became a father) and prompt you to plan for the future (making sure your dreams for your children become a reality).

The first six questions focus on your heritage:

  1. In reflecting on your relationship to your father or father figure, how would you describe his support of you?
  2. Did he regularly show you affection?
  3. Was he present and accessible to you growing up?
  4. Did he struggle with substance abuse or was he unfaithful to your mother?
  5. Did he abuse you or another family member?
  6. Would you say he was a good example?

The second set focuses on your legacy:

  1. What values and skills do you want to pass on to your child?
  2. What are your child’s greatest challenges?
  3. What are his greatest strengths and gifts?
  4. How can you strengthen your relationship with him in the coming year?
  5. What physical and emotional resources will be required for your son or daughter to face the future with confidence?
  6. Whom can you count on for support and counsel as you father your child?

ACTION POINTS ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Honoring Your Father^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

On Father's Day you may get another "interesting" tie, the latest golf gadget or a pair of wild boxer shorts. And then your kids may do something that really makes you feel like a king. Soak it all in, because you deserve it and it's good for your children to honor you.

But as you're celebrating, don't forget that you're also a son, and it's good for you to honor your father or father figure.

ImageThere is something in us—written on our hearts—that says, "Honor your father and mother." That's how it's stated in the Bible, but you'll find it in all the world's religions. Ancient Chinese Analects advise, "Surely proper behavior to parents and elder brothers is the [tree] trunk of goodness."

Your father deserves your honor and appreciation for all he means to you-if for no other reason than simply that he is your father. If you feel that he has failed you, honoring him doesn't mean endorsing his irresponsibility, workaholism or abuse; you're not denying what he did wrong or the pain he caused you. Instead, you're choosing to place great value on your relationship with him, recognizing the good he has done and taking initiative to improve the relationship. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Father Loss^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

In their book, When Your Father Dies , Dave Veerman and Bruce Barton map out the behind-the-scenes processing that a man experiences when his father dies. Neither author fully grasped the pain and anguish associated with “father loss” until their dads passed on.

ImageIn interviews with men, they found a flood of turmoil often followed a father’s death. The ways of responding included: missing the one who cheered you on, feeling alone and vulnerable, receiving your father’s mantle, experiencing emotional waves, and recognizing what you’ve received and what you can pass on.

The essence of their findings echo what we’ve found in our own research here at the Center. Additionally, men who have reasonably good relationships with their fathers will experience a significant drop in their own fathering satisfaction when their fathers die.

This drop is explained by many factors, including: the realization that they are now the head of their clan, the loss of a key supporter, and a more serious and sober commitment to their own family. For men who had a strained relationship with their father, it’s important for them to process any unresolved issues they may have—addressing both joys and regrets in those relationships. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Dealing with Father Memories^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

On the day David's son turned twenty-two, David was uneasy and distracted. You see, he was twenty-two when his own father died. Now all those emotions were coming back, along with a sense that he was in uncharted waters. He later told me, "I suddenly realized that I no longer knew how to father. I didn't have a model for fathering a 22-year-old son."

It's a common reaction. When our children reach the same age we were during significant events in our lives, often the memories and emotions coming flooding back in. When they get their driver's license, you recall getting yours. When they graduate, you can almost feel your own cap and gown from 25 years ago. This phenomenon seems especially apparent when linked with father-son memories.

ImageMaybe your dad helped you with your pitching motion when you were twelve, or spent hours working with you on a seventh grade science project. As your child faces similar challenges at a similar age, use your father's example to inspire you.

But, we also need to be ready for the dark memories. If your father left your family when he was forty-two, watch out when you reach that age. Be careful not to use your father as an excuse to take the easy way out of your commitments. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Honoring Your Father

~Your Heritage and Your Legacy^

Written by Ken Canfield

Some of my recent study has gone toward helping fathers understand the hand-in-hand connection between their heritage and their legacy. Becoming a father is often a catalyst for a man to process his past and begin planning for the future—his and his children’s.

ImageWith that in mind, I have come up with an exercise for fathers consisting of two sets of six questions. These will challenge you to ponder the impact of past experiences (your childhood and adult life leading up to when you became a father) and prompt you to plan for the future (making sure your dreams for your children become a reality).

The first six questions focus on your heritage:

  1. In reflecting on your relationship to your father or father figure, how would you describe his support of you?
  2. Did he regularly show you affection?
  3. Was he present and accessible to you growing up?
  4. Did he struggle with substance abuse or was he unfaithful to your mother?
  5. Did he abuse you or another family member?
  6. Would you say he was a good example?

The second set focuses on your legacy:

  1. What values and skills do you want to pass on to your child?
  2. What are your child’s greatest challenges?
  3. What are his greatest strengths and gifts?
  4. How can you strengthen your relationship with him in the coming year?
  5. What physical and emotional resources will be required for your son or daughter to face the future with confidence?
  6. Whom can you count on for support and counsel as you father your child?

ACTION POINTS ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Honoring Your Father^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

On Father's Day you may get another "interesting" tie, the latest golf gadget or a pair of wild boxer shorts. And then your kids may do something that really makes you feel like a king. Soak it all in, because you deserve it and it's good for your children to honor you.

But as you're celebrating, don't forget that you're also a son, and it's good for you to honor your father or father figure.

ImageThere is something in us—written on our hearts—that says, "Honor your father and mother." That's how it's stated in the Bible, but you'll find it in all the world's religions. Ancient Chinese Analects advise, "Surely proper behavior to parents and elder brothers is the [tree] trunk of goodness."

Your father deserves your honor and appreciation for all he means to you-if for no other reason than simply that he is your father. If you feel that he has failed you, honoring him doesn't mean endorsing his irresponsibility, workaholism or abuse; you're not denying what he did wrong or the pain he caused you. Instead, you're choosing to place great value on your relationship with him, recognizing the good he has done and taking initiative to improve the relationship. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Father Loss^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

In their book, When Your Father Dies , Dave Veerman and Bruce Barton map out the behind-the-scenes processing that a man experiences when his father dies. Neither author fully grasped the pain and anguish associated with “father loss” until their dads passed on.

ImageIn interviews with men, they found a flood of turmoil often followed a father’s death. The ways of responding included: missing the one who cheered you on, feeling alone and vulnerable, receiving your father’s mantle, experiencing emotional waves, and recognizing what you’ve received and what you can pass on.

The essence of their findings echo what we’ve found in our own research here at the Center. Additionally, men who have reasonably good relationships with their fathers will experience a significant drop in their own fathering satisfaction when their fathers die.

This drop is explained by many factors, including: the realization that they are now the head of their clan, the loss of a key supporter, and a more serious and sober commitment to their own family. For men who had a strained relationship with their father, it’s important for them to process any unresolved issues they may have—addressing both joys and regrets in those relationships. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Dealing with Father Memories^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

On the day David's son turned twenty-two, David was uneasy and distracted. You see, he was twenty-two when his own father died. Now all those emotions were coming back, along with a sense that he was in uncharted waters. He later told me, "I suddenly realized that I no longer knew how to father. I didn't have a model for fathering a 22-year-old son."

It's a common reaction. When our children reach the same age we were during significant events in our lives, often the memories and emotions coming flooding back in. When they get their driver's license, you recall getting yours. When they graduate, you can almost feel your own cap and gown from 25 years ago. This phenomenon seems especially apparent when linked with father-son memories.

ImageMaybe your dad helped you with your pitching motion when you were twelve, or spent hours working with you on a seventh grade science project. As your child faces similar challenges at a similar age, use your father's example to inspire you.

But, we also need to be ready for the dark memories. If your father left your family when he was forty-two, watch out when you reach that age. Be careful not to use your father as an excuse to take the easy way out of your commitments. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Father Loss

~Your Heritage and Your Legacy^

Written by Ken Canfield

Some of my recent study has gone toward helping fathers understand the hand-in-hand connection between their heritage and their legacy. Becoming a father is often a catalyst for a man to process his past and begin planning for the future—his and his children’s.

ImageWith that in mind, I have come up with an exercise for fathers consisting of two sets of six questions. These will challenge you to ponder the impact of past experiences (your childhood and adult life leading up to when you became a father) and prompt you to plan for the future (making sure your dreams for your children become a reality).

The first six questions focus on your heritage:

  1. In reflecting on your relationship to your father or father figure, how would you describe his support of you?
  2. Did he regularly show you affection?
  3. Was he present and accessible to you growing up?
  4. Did he struggle with substance abuse or was he unfaithful to your mother?
  5. Did he abuse you or another family member?
  6. Would you say he was a good example?

The second set focuses on your legacy:

  1. What values and skills do you want to pass on to your child?
  2. What are your child’s greatest challenges?
  3. What are his greatest strengths and gifts?
  4. How can you strengthen your relationship with him in the coming year?
  5. What physical and emotional resources will be required for your son or daughter to face the future with confidence?
  6. Whom can you count on for support and counsel as you father your child?

ACTION POINTS ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Honoring Your Father^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

On Father's Day you may get another "interesting" tie, the latest golf gadget or a pair of wild boxer shorts. And then your kids may do something that really makes you feel like a king. Soak it all in, because you deserve it and it's good for your children to honor you.

But as you're celebrating, don't forget that you're also a son, and it's good for you to honor your father or father figure.

ImageThere is something in us—written on our hearts—that says, "Honor your father and mother." That's how it's stated in the Bible, but you'll find it in all the world's religions. Ancient Chinese Analects advise, "Surely proper behavior to parents and elder brothers is the [tree] trunk of goodness."

Your father deserves your honor and appreciation for all he means to you-if for no other reason than simply that he is your father. If you feel that he has failed you, honoring him doesn't mean endorsing his irresponsibility, workaholism or abuse; you're not denying what he did wrong or the pain he caused you. Instead, you're choosing to place great value on your relationship with him, recognizing the good he has done and taking initiative to improve the relationship. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Father Loss^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

In their book, When Your Father Dies , Dave Veerman and Bruce Barton map out the behind-the-scenes processing that a man experiences when his father dies. Neither author fully grasped the pain and anguish associated with “father loss” until their dads passed on.

ImageIn interviews with men, they found a flood of turmoil often followed a father’s death. The ways of responding included: missing the one who cheered you on, feeling alone and vulnerable, receiving your father’s mantle, experiencing emotional waves, and recognizing what you’ve received and what you can pass on.

The essence of their findings echo what we’ve found in our own research here at the Center. Additionally, men who have reasonably good relationships with their fathers will experience a significant drop in their own fathering satisfaction when their fathers die.

This drop is explained by many factors, including: the realization that they are now the head of their clan, the loss of a key supporter, and a more serious and sober commitment to their own family. For men who had a strained relationship with their father, it’s important for them to process any unresolved issues they may have—addressing both joys and regrets in those relationships. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Dealing with Father Memories^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

On the day David's son turned twenty-two, David was uneasy and distracted. You see, he was twenty-two when his own father died. Now all those emotions were coming back, along with a sense that he was in uncharted waters. He later told me, "I suddenly realized that I no longer knew how to father. I didn't have a model for fathering a 22-year-old son."

It's a common reaction. When our children reach the same age we were during significant events in our lives, often the memories and emotions coming flooding back in. When they get their driver's license, you recall getting yours. When they graduate, you can almost feel your own cap and gown from 25 years ago. This phenomenon seems especially apparent when linked with father-son memories.

ImageMaybe your dad helped you with your pitching motion when you were twelve, or spent hours working with you on a seventh grade science project. As your child faces similar challenges at a similar age, use your father's example to inspire you.

But, we also need to be ready for the dark memories. If your father left your family when he was forty-two, watch out when you reach that age. Be careful not to use your father as an excuse to take the easy way out of your commitments. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Local Events

SNA Annual National Conference 2014 - School Nutrition Association
Dates: 7/12/2014 – 7/16/2014
Location:
Venue TBD Boston
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