Charity Events Charleston WV

Every father wants to ensure that his children will grow up to be successful, well-adjusted results. In order for that to happen, fathers must serve as good role models and the following article will give you some ideas on how to do just that.

Kanawha Pastoral Counseling Center
(304) 519-0960
Kanawha Pastoral Counseling Center16 Leon Sullivan Way
Charleston, WV
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Divorce, Parenting
Qualification
School: Our staff has many different credentials
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$20 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: 4-Most

Linda Shimko Geronilla
(304) 342-2260
Charleston, WV
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Clinical Mental Health, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Cynthia Kolsun
(304) 957-9833
Charleston, WV
Practice Areas
Career Development, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, School, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Larry McNeely
(304) 768-1401
South Charleston, WV
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Supervision
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Kanawha Pastoral Counseling
(304) 346-9689
16 Leon Sullivan Way
Charleston, WV
 
Kanawha Pastoral Counseling Center
(304) 346-9689
16 Leon Sullivan Way
Charleston, WV
 
J Elizabeth Conrad
(304) 744-5000
Charleston, WV
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Harold Petry ll
(304) 720-1300
Dunbar, WV
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Mental Health/Agency Counseling, Supervision
Certifications
Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Debra Corrie
(304) 755-4321
Seth, WV
Practice Areas
Career Development, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Ms. Sheli Bernstein-Goff
(304) 336-8295
PO Box 295 CSC 134
West Liberty, WV
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LICSW
Licensed in West Virginia
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Forensic, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Parenting Issues, Sexual Abuse/Rape
Populations Served
Military/Veterans, Offenders/Perpetrators, Step Families, Gifted, Chronic Illness, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Charity Events

Youth Violence - What Fathers Can Do

~Youth Violence - What Fathers Can Do^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 16 October 2009

The brutal murder of a 16-year-old boy in Chicago has brought youth violence to the headlines once again. Many leaders agree that this latest example is one more wake-up call for our nation to take action to combat some alarming trends, but in all of the talk, there are few viable solutions recommended.

One student at the Chicago high school said, "It's up to us to make a change. All of these adults are doing what they need to do to help us."

It's admirable for this student and others like her to recognize that each young person is responsible for his or her actions, but long-term solutions will only be found in addressing some of the root causes of violence, and one major cause is the trend toward greater absence of fathers from their children's lives. Research is conclusive about the link between fatherlessness and higher occurrences of crime and violence in youth.

Fathers who are not only present, but engaged in their children's lives, help shape their children's character. Boys especially need a man there to reel in their aggressive tendencies -- to confront them about disrespect and inappropriate behavior, hold them accountable to a higher standard, and be a model for responsibility and healthy conflict resolution. That's an important part of our role as fathers.

ImageAnd in today's world, with so many unfathered children already, we must take it a step further and be father figures to other kids who don't have a fatherly presence in their lives. Those kids need our encouragement, our modeling, and our accountability as well. If we don't reach out to them, we leave them vulnerable. " Encouraging Another Child " is a critical element of the Championship Fathering Commitment , since the ultimate objective is to change the culture for today's children and the children of coming generations. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Lasting Impressions: A Father's Model^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Occasionally we catch glimpses of our children imitating our behavior. It can be very cute, or it can be a staggering, frightening experience. A toddler tries to do push-ups on the living room floor, just like his dad. He grabs his plastic razor and strains to see the mirror as his dad is shaving. Then, they are in the car together, caught in a traffic jam, and the boy shouts, “Move it, people!”—or something worse.

Older children will be less obvious, and it may take longer before we see them copying us, but the imitation is just as real. Only now, the stakes are higher: they’re making moral choices, forming lasting relationships, perhaps dating, driving, and making decisions about what they want to pursue in life.

Modeling is where our true influence as fathers shows up, because important values are caught more than they are taught. Children learn more from watching our lives than from listening to what we say. Each day, in hundreds of ways, we communicate to our kids, “Follow me.”

This presents both a dilemma and an opportunity. It’s a dilemma because our children will use our lives as reference points, for better or worse, by design or by default. It’s also an opportunity to be intentional about demonstrating for our children what a responsible, calm, caring, self-sacrificing father is like.

WHAT TO MODEL

EMOTIONAL MATURITY ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~One on One with Your Child^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Wednesday, 21 May 2008

James is a busy man with many professional and community responsibilities—and he’s a devoted father. Several years ago, James’ son Darren developed a burning passion for the game of basketball—and he had some skills.

But as James watched his son, he could see that Darren wasn’t living up to his full potential. He challenged Darren to take it up a notch and go beyond just going to practice and putting in the same effort as everyone else. And James realized that he needed to model that same commitment himself, as a father. So he agreed to go to the gym with his boy every day at 5:00 a.m., which meant getting up even earlier than that. Every morning they played one-on-one and ran drills together.

ImageAt first it was just the two of them.  They’d play one-on-one, shoot, and run drills.  After a while, some of the son’s friends heard about this and they started coming as well, and occasionally other fathers came too.  But James was consistent.  He was there every day for his son.  And you can imagine the positive impact this had on their relationship.

The “rest of the story” is that Darren earned a scholarship and is now playing basketball at a small division 1-A college. As a sophomore, he was the starting shooting guard and led the conference in three-point percentage. James attends just about every game, even though the college is out of state and it requires lots of extra travel.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Modeling: Eyes Are on You, Dad^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 07 November 2008

Sporting events are often one of the most revealing “stages” where dads exhibit their fathering. Unfortunately, many of us can remember bad examples of fathering at youth sporting events.

ImageThere are no perfect fathers. We all say and do things that we later regret. But as committed fathers, we should be very aware that our words and actions are being heard and watched. We’re always “on stage,” and that awareness should add extra motivation to speak and act responsibly, or even in a way that encourages and breathes life into those around us.

Each of us should be challenged regularly by these simple questions:

  • What kind of example am I setting? My son is watching, and he needs to know what he should aspire to become.
  • How does a “real man” act? My daughter is watching, because she needs to know what to expect from men.
  • My child’s friends, teammates, and classmates—some of whom don’t have a father at home—are also watching. What lessons about fathering am I teaching them?

And it goes deeper than that. During these uncertain times, our kids are tuning in to everything that’s happening—and they’re watching how we respond. They need stability and security, and dads, our modeling sets the tone. Can your children watch you and see clearly that things will be okay?

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Modeling: At the Pizza Buffet^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Wednesday, 21 May 2008

When it comes to modeling character, the little things add up.

Bruce was treating his three kids and himself to an all-you-can-eat pizza buffet. From the outside, they couldn’t miss the buffet price painted in huge numbers and bright colors on the window. It also advertised the cheaper price for kids, age 4 through 9.

Since Bruce’s oldest child, Parker, had just celebrated his 10th birthday, of course he noticed the sign and commented on it as they stood in line to pay. He was almost proud that he’d be charged the full price for his pizza. Bruce, of course, wasn’t so thrilled. 

ImageWhen they reached the cashier, Bruce was either thinking about something else, or maybe had a lapse in judgment, because the cashier didn’t ask how old Parker was, and Bruce didn’t say anything. So she quickly rang up one adult and three children, Bruce paid the money, and they were herded through.

Wouldn’t you know it, Parker is one of those kids who notices everything. So when they sat down with their plates full of “gourmet” pepperoni pie, he pointed it out. “Dad, they didn’t charge us enough, did they?” ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teach Values with Words and Example^

Written by Carey Casey

Date Posted: Tuesday, 20 May 2008

Part of our work involves helping with development training for some players in the NFL. Not long ago, I was talking with one player and trying to help him through a tough time that was made worse because of his drinking habit. So I asked him, “Where did you first take a drink?” And he told me, “I drank a beer with my dad.”

I can remember another time when a young man had been drinking, then got in a car with his buddies and had an accident. All the other guys in the car either died or had serious injuries, but this young man came out fine, though he served a short time in jail. He came to me afterward to talk about it, and again I asked him, “Shoot me straight. When’s the first time you ever took a drink?” He said, “With my dad.”

Now, most dads would never intentionally initiate their son into a potentially destructive habit like this or hand their child a bottle of something dangerous. But that’s exactly what can happen if we let our guard down. Please remember, dad, that you can communicate values in all sorts of ways.

ImageYour kids are watching you, to be sure. They know if your walk matches your talk, and if you’re inconsistent there, your kids may be vulnerable in those areas, too. Some image or memory of you during their childhood could come back and shape an important decision they face as adults.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

Lasting Impressions: A Father's Model

~Youth Violence - What Fathers Can Do^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 16 October 2009

The brutal murder of a 16-year-old boy in Chicago has brought youth violence to the headlines once again. Many leaders agree that this latest example is one more wake-up call for our nation to take action to combat some alarming trends, but in all of the talk, there are few viable solutions recommended.

One student at the Chicago high school said, "It's up to us to make a change. All of these adults are doing what they need to do to help us."

It's admirable for this student and others like her to recognize that each young person is responsible for his or her actions, but long-term solutions will only be found in addressing some of the root causes of violence, and one major cause is the trend toward greater absence of fathers from their children's lives. Research is conclusive about the link between fatherlessness and higher occurrences of crime and violence in youth.

Fathers who are not only present, but engaged in their children's lives, help shape their children's character. Boys especially need a man there to reel in their aggressive tendencies -- to confront them about disrespect and inappropriate behavior, hold them accountable to a higher standard, and be a model for responsibility and healthy conflict resolution. That's an important part of our role as fathers.

ImageAnd in today's world, with so many unfathered children already, we must take it a step further and be father figures to other kids who don't have a fatherly presence in their lives. Those kids need our encouragement, our modeling, and our accountability as well. If we don't reach out to them, we leave them vulnerable. " Encouraging Another Child " is a critical element of the Championship Fathering Commitment , since the ultimate objective is to change the culture for today's children and the children of coming generations. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Lasting Impressions: A Father's Model^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Occasionally we catch glimpses of our children imitating our behavior. It can be very cute, or it can be a staggering, frightening experience. A toddler tries to do push-ups on the living room floor, just like his dad. He grabs his plastic razor and strains to see the mirror as his dad is shaving. Then, they are in the car together, caught in a traffic jam, and the boy shouts, “Move it, people!”—or something worse.

Older children will be less obvious, and it may take longer before we see them copying us, but the imitation is just as real. Only now, the stakes are higher: they’re making moral choices, forming lasting relationships, perhaps dating, driving, and making decisions about what they want to pursue in life.

Modeling is where our true influence as fathers shows up, because important values are caught more than they are taught. Children learn more from watching our lives than from listening to what we say. Each day, in hundreds of ways, we communicate to our kids, “Follow me.”

This presents both a dilemma and an opportunity. It’s a dilemma because our children will use our lives as reference points, for better or worse, by design or by default. It’s also an opportunity to be intentional about demonstrating for our children what a responsible, calm, caring, self-sacrificing father is like.

WHAT TO MODEL

EMOTIONAL MATURITY ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~One on One with Your Child^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Wednesday, 21 May 2008

James is a busy man with many professional and community responsibilities—and he’s a devoted father. Several years ago, James’ son Darren developed a burning passion for the game of basketball—and he had some skills.

But as James watched his son, he could see that Darren wasn’t living up to his full potential. He challenged Darren to take it up a notch and go beyond just going to practice and putting in the same effort as everyone else. And James realized that he needed to model that same commitment himself, as a father. So he agreed to go to the gym with his boy every day at 5:00 a.m., which meant getting up even earlier than that. Every morning they played one-on-one and ran drills together.

ImageAt first it was just the two of them.  They’d play one-on-one, shoot, and run drills.  After a while, some of the son’s friends heard about this and they started coming as well, and occasionally other fathers came too.  But James was consistent.  He was there every day for his son.  And you can imagine the positive impact this had on their relationship.

The “rest of the story” is that Darren earned a scholarship and is now playing basketball at a small division 1-A college. As a sophomore, he was the starting shooting guard and led the conference in three-point percentage. James attends just about every game, even though the college is out of state and it requires lots of extra travel.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Modeling: Eyes Are on You, Dad^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 07 November 2008

Sporting events are often one of the most revealing “stages” where dads exhibit their fathering. Unfortunately, many of us can remember bad examples of fathering at youth sporting events.

ImageThere are no perfect fathers. We all say and do things that we later regret. But as committed fathers, we should be very aware that our words and actions are being heard and watched. We’re always “on stage,” and that awareness should add extra motivation to speak and act responsibly, or even in a way that encourages and breathes life into those around us.

Each of us should be challenged regularly by these simple questions:

  • What kind of example am I setting? My son is watching, and he needs to know what he should aspire to become.
  • How does a “real man” act? My daughter is watching, because she needs to know what to expect from men.
  • My child’s friends, teammates, and classmates—some of whom don’t have a father at home—are also watching. What lessons about fathering am I teaching them?

And it goes deeper than that. During these uncertain times, our kids are tuning in to everything that’s happening—and they’re watching how we respond. They need stability and security, and dads, our modeling sets the tone. Can your children watch you and see clearly that things will be okay?

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Modeling: At the Pizza Buffet^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Wednesday, 21 May 2008

When it comes to modeling character, the little things add up.

Bruce was treating his three kids and himself to an all-you-can-eat pizza buffet. From the outside, they couldn’t miss the buffet price painted in huge numbers and bright colors on the window. It also advertised the cheaper price for kids, age 4 through 9.

Since Bruce’s oldest child, Parker, had just celebrated his 10th birthday, of course he noticed the sign and commented on it as they stood in line to pay. He was almost proud that he’d be charged the full price for his pizza. Bruce, of course, wasn’t so thrilled. 

ImageWhen they reached the cashier, Bruce was either thinking about something else, or maybe had a lapse in judgment, because the cashier didn’t ask how old Parker was, and Bruce didn’t say anything. So she quickly rang up one adult and three children, Bruce paid the money, and they were herded through.

Wouldn’t you know it, Parker is one of those kids who notices everything. So when they sat down with their plates full of “gourmet” pepperoni pie, he pointed it out. “Dad, they didn’t charge us enough, did they?” ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teach Values with Words and Example^

Written by Carey Casey

Date Posted: Tuesday, 20 May 2008

Part of our work involves helping with development training for some players in the NFL. Not long ago, I was talking with one player and trying to help him through a tough time that was made worse because of his drinking habit. So I asked him, “Where did you first take a drink?” And he told me, “I drank a beer with my dad.”

I can remember another time when a young man had been drinking, then got in a car with his buddies and had an accident. All the other guys in the car either died or had serious injuries, but this young man came out fine, though he served a short time in jail. He came to me afterward to talk about it, and again I asked him, “Shoot me straight. When’s the first time you ever took a drink?” He said, “With my dad.”

Now, most dads would never intentionally initiate their son into a potentially destructive habit like this or hand their child a bottle of something dangerous. But that’s exactly what can happen if we let our guard down. Please remember, dad, that you can communicate values in all sorts of ways.

ImageYour kids are watching you, to be sure. They know if your walk matches your talk, and if you’re inconsistent there, your kids may be vulnerable in those areas, too. Some image or memory of you during their childhood could come back and shape an important decision they face as adults.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

One on One with Your Child

~Youth Violence - What Fathers Can Do^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 16 October 2009

The brutal murder of a 16-year-old boy in Chicago has brought youth violence to the headlines once again. Many leaders agree that this latest example is one more wake-up call for our nation to take action to combat some alarming trends, but in all of the talk, there are few viable solutions recommended.

One student at the Chicago high school said, "It's up to us to make a change. All of these adults are doing what they need to do to help us."

It's admirable for this student and others like her to recognize that each young person is responsible for his or her actions, but long-term solutions will only be found in addressing some of the root causes of violence, and one major cause is the trend toward greater absence of fathers from their children's lives. Research is conclusive about the link between fatherlessness and higher occurrences of crime and violence in youth.

Fathers who are not only present, but engaged in their children's lives, help shape their children's character. Boys especially need a man there to reel in their aggressive tendencies -- to confront them about disrespect and inappropriate behavior, hold them accountable to a higher standard, and be a model for responsibility and healthy conflict resolution. That's an important part of our role as fathers.

ImageAnd in today's world, with so many unfathered children already, we must take it a step further and be father figures to other kids who don't have a fatherly presence in their lives. Those kids need our encouragement, our modeling, and our accountability as well. If we don't reach out to them, we leave them vulnerable. " Encouraging Another Child " is a critical element of the Championship Fathering Commitment , since the ultimate objective is to change the culture for today's children and the children of coming generations. ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Lasting Impressions: A Father's Model^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Occasionally we catch glimpses of our children imitating our behavior. It can be very cute, or it can be a staggering, frightening experience. A toddler tries to do push-ups on the living room floor, just like his dad. He grabs his plastic razor and strains to see the mirror as his dad is shaving. Then, they are in the car together, caught in a traffic jam, and the boy shouts, “Move it, people!”—or something worse.

Older children will be less obvious, and it may take longer before we see them copying us, but the imitation is just as real. Only now, the stakes are higher: they’re making moral choices, forming lasting relationships, perhaps dating, driving, and making decisions about what they want to pursue in life.

Modeling is where our true influence as fathers shows up, because important values are caught more than they are taught. Children learn more from watching our lives than from listening to what we say. Each day, in hundreds of ways, we communicate to our kids, “Follow me.”

This presents both a dilemma and an opportunity. It’s a dilemma because our children will use our lives as reference points, for better or worse, by design or by default. It’s also an opportunity to be intentional about demonstrating for our children what a responsible, calm, caring, self-sacrificing father is like.

WHAT TO MODEL

EMOTIONAL MATURITY ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~One on One with Your Child^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Wednesday, 21 May 2008

James is a busy man with many professional and community responsibilities—and he’s a devoted father. Several years ago, James’ son Darren developed a burning passion for the game of basketball—and he had some skills.

But as James watched his son, he could see that Darren wasn’t living up to his full potential. He challenged Darren to take it up a notch and go beyond just going to practice and putting in the same effort as everyone else. And James realized that he needed to model that same commitment himself, as a father. So he agreed to go to the gym with his boy every day at 5:00 a.m., which meant getting up even earlier than that. Every morning they played one-on-one and ran drills together.

ImageAt first it was just the two of them.  They’d play one-on-one, shoot, and run drills.  After a while, some of the son’s friends heard about this and they started coming as well, and occasionally other fathers came too.  But James was consistent.  He was there every day for his son.  And you can imagine the positive impact this had on their relationship.

The “rest of the story” is that Darren earned a scholarship and is now playing basketball at a small division 1-A college. As a sophomore, he was the starting shooting guard and led the conference in three-point percentage. James attends just about every game, even though the college is out of state and it requires lots of extra travel.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Modeling: Eyes Are on You, Dad^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Friday, 07 November 2008

Sporting events are often one of the most revealing “stages” where dads exhibit their fathering. Unfortunately, many of us can remember bad examples of fathering at youth sporting events.

ImageThere are no perfect fathers. We all say and do things that we later regret. But as committed fathers, we should be very aware that our words and actions are being heard and watched. We’re always “on stage,” and that awareness should add extra motivation to speak and act responsibly, or even in a way that encourages and breathes life into those around us.

Each of us should be challenged regularly by these simple questions:

  • What kind of example am I setting? My son is watching, and he needs to know what he should aspire to become.
  • How does a “real man” act? My daughter is watching, because she needs to know what to expect from men.
  • My child’s friends, teammates, and classmates—some of whom don’t have a father at home—are also watching. What lessons about fathering am I teaching them?

And it goes deeper than that. During these uncertain times, our kids are tuning in to everything that’s happening—and they’re watching how we respond. They need stability and security, and dads, our modeling sets the tone. Can your children watch you and see clearly that things will be okay?

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Modeling: At the Pizza Buffet^

Written by the dads @ fathers.com

Date Posted: Wednesday, 21 May 2008

When it comes to modeling character, the little things add up.

Bruce was treating his three kids and himself to an all-you-can-eat pizza buffet. From the outside, they couldn’t miss the buffet price painted in huge numbers and bright colors on the window. It also advertised the cheaper price for kids, age 4 through 9.

Since Bruce’s oldest child, Parker, had just celebrated his 10th birthday, of course he noticed the sign and commented on it as they stood in line to pay. He was almost proud that he’d be charged the full price for his pizza. Bruce, of course, wasn’t so thrilled. 

ImageWhen they reached the cashier, Bruce was either thinking about something else, or maybe had a lapse in judgment, because the cashier didn’t ask how old Parker was, and Bruce didn’t say anything. So she quickly rang up one adult and three children, Bruce paid the money, and they were herded through.

Wouldn’t you know it, Parker is one of those kids who notices everything. So when they sat down with their plates full of “gourmet” pepperoni pie, he pointed it out. “Dad, they didn’t charge us enough, did they?” ...

Click here to read more from Fathers.com

~Teach Values with Words and Example^

Written by Carey Casey

Date Posted: Tuesday, 20 May 2008

Part of our work involves helping with development training for some players in the NFL. Not long ago, I was talking with one player and trying to help him through a tough time that was made worse because of his drinking habit. So I asked him, “Where did you first take a drink?” And he told me, “I drank a beer with my dad.”

I can remember another time when a young man had been drinking, then got in a car with his buddies and had an accident. All the other guys in the car either died or had serious injuries, but this young man came out fine, though he served a short time in jail. He came to me afterward to talk about it, and again I asked him, “Shoot me straight. When’s the first time you ever took a drink?” He said, “With my dad.”

Now, most dads would never intentionally initiate their son into a potentially destructive habit like this or hand their child a bottle of something dangerous. But that’s exactly what can happen if we let our guard down. Please remember, dad, that you can communicate values in all sorts of ways.

ImageYour kids are watching you, to be sure. They know if your walk matches your talk, and if you’re inconsistent there, your kids may be vulnerable in those areas, too. Some image or memory of you during their childhood could come back and shape an important decision they face as adults.

Click here to read more from Fathers.com